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The relation of high density lipoprotein cholesterol and its subfractions to apolipoprotein A-I and fasting triglycerides: the role of environmental factors. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.

TitleThe relation of high density lipoprotein cholesterol and its subfractions to apolipoprotein A-I and fasting triglycerides: the role of environmental factors. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1992
AuthorsPatsch W, Sharrett AR, Sorlie PD, Davis CE, Brown SA
JournalAm J Epidemiol
Volume136
Issue5
Pagination546-57
Date Published1992 Sep 01
ISSN0002-9262
KeywordsAged, Alcohol Drinking, Apolipoprotein A-I, Arteriosclerosis, Body Mass Index, Cholesterol, HDL, Continental Population Groups, Cross-Sectional Studies, Environment, Exercise, Fasting, Female, Humans, Linear Models, Male, Maryland, Middle Aged, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Obesity, Risk Factors, Smoking, Triglycerides
Abstract

Cross-sectional analysis of four general representative populations of middle-aged adults in the United States in 1986-1989 provides estimates of the close relation of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL cholesterol) to its major structural apolipoprotein (apolipoprotein A-I) and to fasting plasma triglyceride levels. HDL cholesterol differences of approximately 0.4 mg were associated with 1-mg differences in apolipoprotein A-I; differences of 20% in HDL cholesterol (reductions) were associated with triglyceride doublings. Variation in apolipoprotein A-I and triglyceride concentration together accounted for 66% of the population variance in HDL cholesterol. The uniformity of this pattern in the four race-sex groups studied suggests an important role of triglyceride-cholesterol transfer as a determinant of HDL cholesterol. The fundamental relations observed among HDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein A-I, and triglycerides were unaltered by levels of factors under personal volition. The volitional factors appeared to influence HDL cholesterol indirectly: Obesity and physical activity were affected primarily through their associations with triglycerides, and alcohol use and smoking through associations with apolipoprotein A-I. The association of alcohol use with elevated HDL cholesterol was attenuated in persons with greater body mass.

DOI10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a116532
Alternate JournalAm J Epidemiol
PubMed ID1442718
Grant ListN01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States