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Fasting hyperinsulinemia and cardiovascular disease risk factors in nondiabetic adults: stronger associations in lean versus obese subjects. Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study Investigators.

TitleFasting hyperinsulinemia and cardiovascular disease risk factors in nondiabetic adults: stronger associations in lean versus obese subjects. Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study Investigators.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1995
AuthorsNabulsi AA, Folsom AR, Heiss G, Weir SS, Chambless LE, Watson RL, Eckfeldt JH
JournalMetabolism
Volume44
Issue7
Pagination914-22
Date Published1995 Jul
ISSN0026-0495
KeywordsAfrican Continental Ancestry Group, Body Weight, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cross-Sectional Studies, European Continental Ancestry Group, Fasting, Female, Humans, Hyperinsulinism, Insulin, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Risk Factors, Sex Factors
Abstract

The association between hyperinsulinemia and atherogenic risk factors has not been well studied in blacks and may be different for obese versus lean individuals. To investigate this possibility and to confirm the associations of hyperinsulinemia with cardiovascular disease risk factors in blacks and whites, we analyzed the joint associations of fasting serum insulin and obesity with risk factors in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study (1,293 black men, 4,797 white men, 2,033 black women, and 5,445 white women). Insulin values > or = 90th percentile (> or = 21 microU/mL) constituted hyperinsulinemia; body mass index (BMI) values > or = 27.3 kg/m2 for women and > or = 27.8 for men constituted obesity. Participants with hyperinsulinemia in all four race-sex groups had more atherogenic levels of most risk factors studied than those with normoinsulinemia. Among black men and women, mean levels of triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), apolipoprotein (apo) B, glucose, and fibrinogen (men only) were higher in hyperinsulinemic lean participants as compared with the normoinsulinemic obese group. Furthermore, most associations between insulin level and risk factors were stronger among lean versus obese subjects. For example, among lean black men, the difference in mean triglyceride concentration between those with hyperinsulinemia and those with normoinsulinemia was 147 - 99 = 48 mg/dL; among obese black men, the difference was 155 - 121 = 34 mg/dL (P

DOI10.1016/0026-0495(95)90245-7
Alternate JournalMetabolism
PubMed ID7616851
Grant ListN01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States