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Lipoprotein(a) as a correlate of stroke and transient ischemic attack prevalence in a biracial cohort: the ARIC Study. Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities.

TitleLipoprotein(a) as a correlate of stroke and transient ischemic attack prevalence in a biracial cohort: the ARIC Study. Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1994
AuthorsSchreiner PJ, Chambless LE, Brown SA, Watson RL, Toole J, Heiss G
JournalAnn Epidemiol
Volume4
Issue5
Pagination351-9
Date Published1994 Sep
ISSN1047-2797
KeywordsAfrican Americans, Cerebrovascular Disorders, Cohort Studies, Confidence Intervals, Cross-Sectional Studies, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Ischemic Attack, Transient, Lipoprotein(a), Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Prevalence, Regression Analysis, Risk, Risk Factors, United States
Abstract

Although both mean lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] concentration and national stroke prevalence estimates are consistently higher in American blacks than in whites, no information exists on the relationship of Lp(a) and stroke prevalence in African-Americans. Associations of Lp(a) with stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) are addressed in this report for 15,160 participants--4160 blacks and 11,000 whites--in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Lp(a) was measured in ARIC as its total protein component by double-antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for apo(a) detection. Self-reported stroke/TIA history was assessed as part of a standardized questionnaire, and resulted in age-adjusted stroke/TIA prevalences of 3.0% in blacks (n = 120) and 2.0% in whites (n = 222). Overall, mean Lp(a) protein levels were markedly higher for blacks than for whites (160.5 versus 81.6 micrograms/mL, respectively), and were statistically significantly higher among individuals reporting stroke/TIA history for both races (191.3 versus 159.6 micrograms/mL in blacks; 100.6 versus 81.2 micrograms/mL in whites). Multivariable logistic regression analysis for the association of Lp(a) protein with stroke/TIA status yielded a prevalence odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence intervals) of 1.17 (1.05, 1.30) overall (based on one standard deviation difference, 108.2 micrograms/mL, in Lp[a] protein). Race-specific ORs, after adjustment for the same covariates, were equivalent for blacks [OR = 1.17 (0.99, 1.39)] and whites [OR = 1.19 (1.04, 1.36)]. These data suggest that Lp(a) is an independent risk factor for stroke/TIA in both blacks and whites, and that the relative risk of stroke/TIA associated with Lp(a) protein does not vary by race.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

DOI10.1016/1047-2797(94)90068-x
Alternate JournalAnn Epidemiol
PubMed ID7981841
Grant ListN01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States