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Plasma lipid, lipoprotein cholesterol, and apoprotein distributions in selected US communities. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.

TitlePlasma lipid, lipoprotein cholesterol, and apoprotein distributions in selected US communities. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1993
AuthorsBrown SA, Hutchinson R, Morrisett J, Boerwinkle E, Davis CE, Gotto AM, Patsch W
JournalArterioscler Thromb
Volume13
Issue8
Pagination1139-58
Date Published1993 Aug
ISSN1049-8834
KeywordsAfrican Continental Ancestry Group, Apoproteins, Arteriosclerosis, Cholesterol, Estrogen Replacement Therapy, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Lipids, Lipoproteins, Male, Menopause, Middle Aged, Risk Factors, United States
Abstract

The distributions of plasma lipids, lipoproteins, and apoproteins of 14,524 female and male black and white participants 45 to 64 years old in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study are presented. All specimens were analyzed at a central laboratory. Mean total cholesterol levels increased with increasing age across all ages from 204 to 229 mg/dL (12%) in women and from 208 to 213 mg/dL (2%) in men. Triglyceride levels increased with age in women, remained stable in men, and were higher in whites than blacks. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels were higher in black and white women (range, 57 to 59 mg/dL) compared with black men (49 to 52 mg/dL) or white men (42 to 43 mg/dL). Cholesterol associated with HDL was distributed in a relatively constant proportion between HDL3 (70% to 76%) and HDL2 (24% to 30%) for all race/sex groups. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels increased with age in black (14.7%) and white (17.1%) women and in black (4.4%) and white (3.7%) men; more than 50% of all participants had LDL cholesterol levels > 130 mg/dL. Apoprotein A-I and B levels followed the same trends as HDL cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels, respectively. Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels were twice as high in blacks as in whites, and women's Lp(a) levels were higher than men's Lp(a) levels for each race. Menopause was associated with elevated total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, apoprotein B, and Lp(a) levels, and hormone replacement medication use in postmenopausal subjects was associated with higher HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, and apoprotein A-I levels and lower LDL cholesterol, apoprotein B, and Lp(a) levels.

DOI10.1161/01.atv.13.8.1139
Alternate JournalArterioscler Thromb
PubMed ID8343489
Grant ListN01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States