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Racial differences in risk factors for atherosclerosis. The ARIC Study. Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities.

TitleRacial differences in risk factors for atherosclerosis. The ARIC Study. Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1997
AuthorsHutchinson RG, Watson RL, Davis CE, Barnes R, Brown S, Romm F, Spencer JM, Tyroler HA, Wu K
JournalAngiology
Volume48
Issue4
Pagination279-90
Date Published1997 Apr
ISSN0003-3197
KeywordsAfrican Continental Ancestry Group, Arteriosclerosis, Blood Glucose, Cohort Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Hypertension, Lipids, Male, Maryland, Middle Aged, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Obesity, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Smoking
Abstract

This paper describes black/white differences in risk factors for atherosclerosis in the large multicenter Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Project sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. It is based on data collected at baseline in ARIC's four geographically distinct clinical centers. Participants were randomly selected (4264 black and 11,479 white men and women, ages forty-five to sixty-four years at entry). There were striking differences in obesity between black and white women, higher fasting glucose and greater prevalence of diabetes in blacks, and lower high-density lipoprotein values in white men. Not unexpectedly, blood pressure in black participants exceeded that in whites. Clustering of multiple risk factors was more common in the black population. Conversely, prevalence of no risk factors was greatest among whites. In conclusion, while African-Americans and Caucasians share much the same group of risk factors for atherosclerosis, there are clinically important racial differences in emphasis.

DOI10.1177/000331979704800401
Alternate JournalAngiology
PubMed ID9112876
Grant ListN01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States