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Women, employment status, and hypertension: cross-sectional and prospective findings from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.

TitleWomen, employment status, and hypertension: cross-sectional and prospective findings from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1999
AuthorsRose KM, Newman B, Tyroler HA, Szklo M, Arnett D, Srivastava N
JournalAnn Epidemiol
Volume9
Issue6
Pagination374-82
Date Published1999 Aug
ISSN1047-2797
KeywordsAfrican Americans, Arteriosclerosis, Cross-Sectional Studies, Employment, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Logistic Models, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies
Abstract

PURPOSE: This study examined the cross-sectional and prospective associations between employment status and hypertension among middle-aged, African-American (AA) and European-American (EA) women participating in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

METHODS: Employed women and homemakers from the baseline examination (1987-89) were included in the cross-sectional study (n = 7351). Associations between employment and the incidence of hypertension ascertained at visit 2 (1990-92) were determined among those who at baseline, had low-normal blood pressure (not hypertensive and systolic blood pressure (SBP)

RESULTS: At baseline, employed women were less likely to be hypertensive (SBP > or =140 mm Hg or DBP > or =90 mm Hg or current use of antihypertensive drugs) than were homemakers (prevalence odds ratio) (POR) = 0.70; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.62-0.79), controlling for age, body mass index, and education. Among the subgroup who had low-normal blood pressure at baseline, employed women were less likely to develop hypertension during the three-year time period than were homemakers (odds ratio (OR) = 0.68; 95% CI = 0.44-1.05). The inverse association was stronger among AA (RR = 0.37; 95% CI = 0.16-0.88) than EA (OR = 0.83; 95% CI = 0.50-1.38) women.

CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the inverse association between hypertension and employment status is not due to a healthy worker effect, and that employment may confer protection against incident hypertension in women.

DOI10.1016/s1047-2797(99)00015-0
Alternate JournalAnn Epidemiol
PubMed ID10475537
Grant ListN01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States