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Racial disparities in CHD mortality from 1968-1992 in the state economic areas surrounding the ARIC study communities. Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities.

TitleRacial disparities in CHD mortality from 1968-1992 in the state economic areas surrounding the ARIC study communities. Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1999
AuthorsWilliams JE, Massing M, Rosamond WD, Sorlie PD, Tyroler HA
JournalAnn Epidemiol
Volume9
Issue8
Pagination472-80
Date Published1999 Nov
ISSN1047-2797
KeywordsAdult, African Americans, Age Factors, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Arteriosclerosis, Coronary Disease, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Myocardial Infarction, Population Surveillance, Regression Analysis, Risk Factors, Sex Factors, Small-Area Analysis, Socioeconomic Factors, Southeastern United States
Abstract

PURPOSE: This study examined racial variations in CHD (coronary heart disease) mortality rates (1968-1992) of residents aged 35-84 in the state economic areas (SEAs) surrounding the ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) study. The quarter century of CHD mortality rates are discussed in relation to racial and gender differences in baseline risk factors measured in the ARIC cohort and to the incidence of hospitalized myocardial infarction and case fatality rates obtained from the community surveillance component of the ARIC study between 1987 and 1994, inclusive.

METHODS: Five-year average annual, gender- and age-specific CHD mortality rates were compared across race groups, based on National Vital Statistics data for state economic areas.

RESULTS: Five-year average annual CHD mortality declined 2.6% for white men and women and 1.6% and 2.2% for black men and women, respectively. The black-white mortality rate ratio increased over time for men and women. The black-white mortality age crossover (higher black than white mortality in young men, lower black than white mortality at older ages) had disappeared by the end of the observation. CHD mortality was markedly greater in black than white women at all ages and time periods. The black disadvantage in CHD mortality was increasingly greater in the ARIC SEAs than in the United States as a whole.

CONCLUSIONS: Persistent and increasing racial disparities in CHD mortality occurred in the ARIC SEAs concurrently with racial differences in risk factors, the incidence of myocardial infarction, and case fatality rates.

DOI10.1016/s1047-2797(99)00029-0
Alternate JournalAnn Epidemiol
PubMed ID10549880
Grant List5T32HL07055 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States