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The Family Risk Score for coronary heart disease: associations with lipids, lipoproteins, and body habitus in a middle-aged bi-racial cohort: The ARIC study.

TitleThe Family Risk Score for coronary heart disease: associations with lipids, lipoproteins, and body habitus in a middle-aged bi-racial cohort: The ARIC study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2000
AuthorsPereira MA, Schreiner PJ, Pankow JS, Williams RR, Higgins M, Province MA, Rao DC
JournalAnn Epidemiol
Volume10
Issue4
Pagination239-45
Date Published2000 May
ISSN1047-2797
KeywordsAdult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Age Factors, Aged, Body Mass Index, Cohort Studies, Coronary Disease, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Lipids, Lipoproteins, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Probability, Prospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Smoking
Abstract

PURPOSE: To examine the association between the Family Risk Score (FRS) for coronary heart disease (CHD) and body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), high density lipoprotein (HDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, and lipoprotein(a) protein [Lp(a)].

METHODS: FRS was computed from observed and expected CHD events using family data collected from 11467 black and white adults of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC). BMI, WHR, and lipids adjusted for study center, race, education, BMI (except BMI), WHR (except for BMI and WHR), cigarette smoking, alcohol, and Keys' score were compared among low (FRS 0.5) FRS using analysis of covariance. The association between FRS and these risk factors was compared to that for simpler estimates of family risk.

RESULTS: Adjusted means of BMI, WHR, LDL, LP(a), and triglycerides were positively associated with FRS, whereas HDL cholesterol was inversely associated with FRS. Of demographic and behavioral factors, cigarette smoking was most strongly associated with FRS. Based on additional comparisons of adjusted means, high vs. low levels of FRS appear to correlate better with CHD risk factors than do the simpler family history assessments.

CONCLUSIONS: In situations were genetic or clinical information is not available, FRS may be a favorable measure of familial burden for CHD.

DOI10.1016/s1047-2797(99)00056-3
Alternate JournalAnn Epidemiol
PubMed ID10917717
Grant ListN01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States