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Fibrinogen, other putative markers of inflammation, and weight gain in middle-aged adults--the ARIC study. Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities.

TitleFibrinogen, other putative markers of inflammation, and weight gain in middle-aged adults--the ARIC study. Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2000
AuthorsDuncan BB, Schmidt MI, Chambless LE, Folsom AR, Carpenter M, Heiss G
JournalObes Res
Volume8
Issue4
Pagination279-86
Date Published2000 Jul
ISSN1071-7323
KeywordsArteriosclerosis, Biomarkers, Cohort Studies, Factor VIII, Female, Fibrinogen, Humans, Inflammation, Leukocyte Count, Linear Models, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Risk Factors, von Willebrand Factor, Weight Gain
Abstract

PURPOSE: Weight gain is an important risk factor for the development of the metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory mediators are strongly associated with this syndrome. Our aim was to investigate whether inflammation predicts the development of weight gain in populations.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: We investigated selected markers of inflammation in the prediction of weight gain over an approximately 3-year period in a biethnic cohort of 13,017 men and women, 45 to 64 years of age, using multiple linear and logistic regression modeling.

RESULTS: In adjusted models, those in the highest quartile of fibrinogen gained, during the first 3 years of follow-up, an estimated 0.23 kg/year more than those in the lowest quartile (p

DISCUSSION: Fibrinogen and other putative markers of inflammation predict weight gain in middle-aged adults. Given the known links between the inflammatory response and intermediary metabolism and the methodological strengths of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) cohort, these findings, though without immediate clinical applicability, suggest that inflammatory processes play a role in the development of the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease in part through stimulation of weight gain.

DOI10.1038/oby.2000.33
Alternate JournalObes Res
PubMed ID10933303
Grant ListN01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States