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Multi-country comparison of plasma lipid relationship to years of schooling in men and women.

TitleMulti-country comparison of plasma lipid relationship to years of schooling in men and women.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2001
AuthorsPerova NV, Davis CE, Tao S, Pajak A, Stein Y, Broda GB, Li Y, Tyroler HA
JournalInt J Epidemiol
Volume30
Issue2
Pagination371-9
Date Published2001 Apr
ISSN0300-5771
KeywordsAsia, Cholesterol, Cholesterol, HDL, Cholesterol, LDL, Cross-Cultural Comparison, Education, Europe, Eastern, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Regression Analysis, Risk Factors, Triglycerides, United States
Abstract

BACKGROUND: The association between coronary heart disease (CHD) and social status has differed among societies in strength and direction. As years of schooling is a major determinant of socioeconomic status and dyslipidaemia a major CHD determinant, the purpose of this investigation is to estimate the association of years of schooling with plasma lipids and lipoproteins among samples from five countries representing different cultures, socio-political systems and stages of economic development.

METHODS: Men and women from Chinese, Polish, Russian, Israeli and US samples were studied. Years of schooling were analysed both as a multi-category ordinal variable and divided into two strata: less than the equivalent of high school and greater than or equal to high school equivalence. Fasting plasma cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglycerides were compared across years of schooling strata within each country. Lipid levels were computed unadjusted and then adjusted for age and lipid risk factor variables.

RESULTS: Total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides varied directly with years of schooling in Chinese, Polish and Russian men, and in contrast varied inversely with years of schooling among US white men. The HDL cholesterol varied inversely with years of schooling for Chinese, Polish, and Russian men, but varied directly with years of schooling among US white men. The lipid differences between men of high versus low years of schooling were not explained by age, body mass index, smoking, alcohol consumption or blood pressure medication use. Findings were less consistent for women and for Israelis and US blacks of both genders.

CONCLUSIONS: Lipid and lipoprotein levels consistent with atherogenicity varied directly with years of schooling in Chinese, Polish, and Russian samples. Opposite trends were present in US whites. These findings are consistent with a hypothesized influence of social status on CHD risk differing among populations in relation to stages in societal economic development.

DOI10.1093/ije/30.2.371
Alternate JournalInt J Epidemiol
PubMed ID11369745
Grant ListN0-1HV12243 / HV / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N0-1HV59224 / HV / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HV08112 / HV / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States