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Effects of an angry temperament on coronary heart disease risk : The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

TitleEffects of an angry temperament on coronary heart disease risk : The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2001
AuthorsWilliams JE, Nieto FJ, Sanford CP, Tyroler HA
JournalAm J Epidemiol
Volume154
Issue3
Pagination230-5
Date Published2001 Aug 01
ISSN0002-9262
KeywordsAfrican Continental Ancestry Group, Anger, Arteriosclerosis, Comorbidity, Coronary Disease, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Hypertension, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Survival Analysis, Survival Rate, Temperament, United States
Abstract

The objective of the study was to determine which component of an anger-prone personality more strongly predicts coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Proneness to anger, as assessed by the Spielberger Trait Anger Scale, is composed of two distinct subcomponents-anger-temperament and anger-reaction. Participants were 12,990 middle-aged Black men and women and White men and women from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study who were followed for the occurrence of acute myocardial infarction (MI)/fatal CHD, silent MI, or cardiac revascularization procedures (average = 53 months; maximum = 72 months) through December 31, 1995. Among normotensive persons, a strong, angry temperament (tendency toward quick, minimally provoked, or unprovoked anger) was associated with combined CHD (acute MI/fatal CHD, silent MI, or cardiac revascularization procedures) (multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio = 2.10, 95% confidence interval: 1.34, 3.29) and with 'hard" events (acute MI/fatal CHD) (multivariate adjusted hazard ratio = 2.28, 95% confidence interval: 1.29, 4.02). CHD event-free survival among normotensives who had a strong, angry temperament was not significantly different from that of hypertensives at either level of anger. These data suggest that a strong, angry temperament rather than anger in reaction to criticism, frustration, or unfair treatment places normotensive, middle-aged persons at increased risk for cardiac events and may confer a CHD risk similar to that of hypertension.

DOI10.1093/aje/154.3.230
Alternate JournalAm J Epidemiol
PubMed ID11479187
Grant List5-T32-HL07055 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55020 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55022 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States