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The contextual effect of the local food environment on residents' diets: the atherosclerosis risk in communities study.

TitleThe contextual effect of the local food environment on residents' diets: the atherosclerosis risk in communities study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2002
AuthorsMorland K, Wing S, Roux ADiez
JournalAm J Public Health
Volume92
Issue11
Pagination1761-7
Date Published2002 Nov
ISSN0090-0036
KeywordsAfrican Americans, Arteriosclerosis, Censuses, Cholesterol, Dietary, Commerce, Diet, Dietary Fats, Eating, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Food Supply, Fruit, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Poverty Areas, Residence Characteristics, Restaurants, Risk Assessment, Social Conditions, United States, Vegetables
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We studied the association between the local food environment and residents' report of recommended dietary intake.

METHODS: Recommended intakes of foods and nutrients for 10 623 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities participants were estimated from food frequency questionnaires. Supermarkets, grocery stores, and full-service and fast-food restaurants were geocoded to census tracts.

RESULTS: Black Americans' fruit and vegetable intake increased by 32% for each additional supermarket in the census tract (relative risk [RR] = 1.32; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08, 1.60). White Americans' fruit and vegetable intake increased by 11% with the presence of 1 or more supermarket (RR = 1.11; 95% CI = 0.93, 1.32).

CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest the local food environment is associated with residents' recommended diets.

DOI10.2105/ajph.92.11.1761
Alternate JournalAm J Public Health
PubMed ID12406805
PubMed Central IDPMC1447325
Grant ListR25 ES008206 / ES / NIEHS NIH HHS / United States
2 R25 ES08206-05 / ES / NIEHS NIH HHS / United States
R29 HL59386 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States