Pulse lineResearch With Heart Logo

Characterization of incident stroke signs and symptoms: findings from the atherosclerosis risk in communities study.

TitleCharacterization of incident stroke signs and symptoms: findings from the atherosclerosis risk in communities study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2002
AuthorsRathore SS, Hinn AR, Cooper LS, Tyroler HA, Rosamond WD
JournalStroke
Volume33
Issue11
Pagination2718-21
Date Published2002 Nov
ISSN1524-4628
KeywordsAfrican Continental Ancestry Group, Arteriosclerosis, Brain Ischemia, Causality, Cerebral Hemorrhage, Cohort Studies, Comorbidity, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Gait Disorders, Neurologic, Headache, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Paresis, Risk, Seizures, Sex Factors, Speech Disorders, Stroke, United States, Vertigo, Vision Disorders
Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although patterns of stroke occurrence and mortality have been well studied, few epidemiological data are available regarding the clinical characteristics of stroke events.

METHODS: We evaluated hospitalized stroke events reported in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study to describe the clinical characteristics of incident stroke. Confirmed stroke cases (n=474) were evaluated for stroke symptoms (headache, vertigo, gait disturbance, convulsions) and stroke signs (hemianopia, diplopia, speech deficits, paresis, paresthesia/sensory deficits) and their univariate associations with race, sex, and stroke subtype.

RESULTS: Over 9.2 years of follow-up, 402 (85%) ischemic and 72 (15%) hemorrhagic strokes occurred. Frequency of stroke symptoms (95% CIs) were as follows: headache (27.4%; 23.4% to 31.4%), gait disturbance (10.8%; 7.9% to 13.6%), convulsions (4.4%; 2.6% to 6.3%), and vertigo (2.1%; 0.8% to 3.4%). Speech deficits occurred in 24.0% (20.2% to 27.9%), hemianopia in 14.6% (11.4% to 17.7%), and diplopia in 5.5% (3.4% to 7.5%) of cases. Most cases involved paresis (81.6%; 78.1% to 85.1%), while fewer cases experienced sensory deficits (44.5%; 40.0% to 49.0%). Blacks were more likely than whites to experience paresis (85.4% versus 78.2%; P=0.044). Men were more likely than women to experience a gait disturbance (14.4% versus 6.7%; P=0.007). Persons with hemorrhagic strokes had a higher proportion of headaches (55.6% versus 22.4%; P=0.001) and convulsions (11.1% versus 3.2%; P=0.003) than those with ischemic events, while speech and sensory deficits were more common in ischemic strokes (26.1% versus 12.5%, P=0.013, and 49.0% versus 19.4%, P=0.001, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS: We present epidemiological data concerning the clinical characteristics of incident stroke in a population-based cohort. Although minor differences by race, sex, and stroke subtype were observed, data from additional follow-up are required to confirm observed variations.

DOI10.1161/01.str.0000035286.87503.31
Alternate JournalStroke
PubMed ID12411667
Grant ListN01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55020 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55021 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55022 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States