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Body mass index and blood pressure influences on left ventricular mass and geometry in African Americans: The Atherosclerotic Risk In Communities (ARIC) Study.

TitleBody mass index and blood pressure influences on left ventricular mass and geometry in African Americans: The Atherosclerotic Risk In Communities (ARIC) Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2004
AuthorsFox E, Taylor H, Andrew M, Han H, Mohamed E, Garrison R, Skelton T
JournalHypertension
Volume44
Issue1
Pagination55-60
Date Published2004 Jul
ISSN1524-4563
KeywordsAfrican Americans, Aged, Blood Pressure, Body Mass Index, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Heart Ventricles, Humans, Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular, Male, Middle Aged, Risk Factors, Ultrasonography
Abstract

A unique interaction between the influences of body mass index and blood pressure on left ventricular mass index and geometry may contribute to the higher prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy in African Americans. This cross-sectional study assessed separate and joint influences of body mass index and blood pressure on left ventricular mass index and geometry in 1729 African American participants of the Atherosclerotic Risk in Communities Study. The association between both left ventricular mass index and relative wall thickness and body mass index in each blood pressure category and between these variables and blood pressure in each body mass index category was assessed adjusting for age, diabetes status, hypertension medication, and smoking status. We found that left ventricular hypertrophy and concentric geometry were highly prevalent and that body mass index and blood pressure were independently associated with left ventricular mass index. The adjusted association between blood pressure and left ventricular mass index was stronger with higher body mass index categories; however, there was no significant interaction suggesting merely an additive relationship (not synergistic/multiplicative as tested for in the interaction analysis). Although relative wall thickness was greater with higher categories of body mass index and blood pressure, the mean difference in relative wall thickness between body mass index and blood pressure categories was not statistically significant. The effect on left ventricular geometry as measured by relative wall thickness supports the theory that there is a pathophysiological component in the mechanism of hypertrophy.

DOI10.1161/01.HYP.0000132373.26489.58
Alternate JournalHypertension
PubMed ID15184348
Grant ListN01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55020 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55021 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55022 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States