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Abdominal fat distribution and functional limitations and disability in a biracial cohort: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

TitleAbdominal fat distribution and functional limitations and disability in a biracial cohort: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2005
AuthorsHouston DK, Stevens J, Cai J
JournalInt J Obes (Lond)
Volume29
Issue12
Pagination1457-63
Date Published2005 Dec
ISSN0307-0565
KeywordsAbdominal Fat, Activities of Daily Living, African Americans, Aged, Atherosclerosis, Body Constitution, Body Mass Index, Cohort Studies, Disabled Persons, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Odds Ratio, Prospective Studies, United States, Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the associations of abdominal fat and obesity with functional limitations and disability in late adulthood.

DESIGN: Longitudinal, cohort study.

PARTICIPANTS: African American and white men and women aged 45-64 y at baseline with measured waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and body mass index (BMI) who participated in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study (n = 9416).

OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported functional limitations, activities of daily living (ADLs), and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) at ages 52-75 y.

RESULTS: Waist circumference, WHR, and BMI were positively associated with functional limitations and ADL and IADL impairment approximately 9 y later among African American and white men and women. For example, in African American women the odds ratios (95% CI) associated with a one standard deviation (s.d.) increment in waist circumference (13.3 cm) for severe functional limitations and ADL and IADL impairment were 2.36 (2.00-2.79), 1.41 (1.25-1.58), and 1.49 (1.34-1.66), respectively. In white women, the odds ratios (95% CI) were 2.66 (2.39-2.96), 1.60 (1.47-1.74), and 1.42 (1.31-1.53), respectively. Similar associations were found in men. A 1 s.d. increment in WHR (0.08 U) and BMI (5.06 kg/m2) produced similar results. The associations of waist circumference and WHR with functional limitations and ADL and IADL impairment were attenuated but, in general, remained statistically significant when BMI was added to the models.

CONCLUSIONS: Maintaining a healthy body weight and avoiding increases in abdominal fat should be investigated for their potential to reduce the risk of functional limitations and disability in an aging population.

DOI10.1038/sj.ijo.0803043
Alternate JournalInt J Obes (Lond)
PubMed ID16077713
Grant List1 R03 AG022062-01 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States