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Socioeconomic disadvantage and periodontal disease: the Dental Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study.

TitleSocioeconomic disadvantage and periodontal disease: the Dental Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2006
AuthorsBorrell LN, Beck JD, Heiss G
JournalAm J Public Health
Volume96
Issue2
Pagination332-9
Date Published2006 Feb
ISSN0090-0036
KeywordsAfrican Continental Ancestry Group, Atherosclerosis, Cross-Sectional Studies, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Periodontal Diseases, Prevalence, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Social Class, Socioeconomic Factors, United States
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We used data from the Dental Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study to examine whether individual- and neighborhood-level socioeconomic characteristics were associated with periodontal disease.

METHODS: We assessed severe periodontitis with a combination of clinical attachment loss and pocket depth measures. Marginal logistic regression modeling was used to estimate the association between individual and neighborhood socioeconomic indicators and prevalence of severe periodontitis before and after control for selected covariates. Residual intraneighborhood correlations in outcomes were taken into account in the analyses.

RESULTS: Individual-level income and education were associated with severe periodontitis among Whites and African Americans, and these associations remained significant after adjustment for age, gender, recruitment center, and neighborhood socioeconomic score. Low-income Whites residing in disadvantaged neighborhoods had 1.8-fold (95% confidence interval=1.2, 2.7) higher odds of having severe periodontitis than high-income Whites residing in advantaged neighborhoods.

CONCLUSIONS: Individual income and education were associated with severe periodontitis independently of neighborhood socioeconomic circumstances. Although the association between neighborhood socioeconomic status and severe periodontitis was not statistically significant, poverty and residence in a disadvantaged neighborhood were associated with higher odds of severe periodontitis among Whites.

DOI10.2105/AJPH.2004.055277
Alternate JournalAm J Public Health
PubMed ID16380570
PubMed Central IDPMC1470476
Grant ListN01HC55020 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 DE011551 / DE / NIDCR NIH HHS / United States
K22 DE015317 / DE / NIDCR NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC 55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55018 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC 55021 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL064142 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55022 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55015 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC 55022 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC 55019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC 55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55016 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC 55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K22 DE 15317 / DE / NIDCR NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55019 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55021 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC 55020 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL 64142-01A1 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States