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Left ventricular architecture and survival in African-Americans free of coronary heart disease (from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities [ARIC] study).

TitleLeft ventricular architecture and survival in African-Americans free of coronary heart disease (from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities [ARIC] study).
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsTaylor HA, Penman AD, Han H, Dele-Michael A, Skelton TN, Fox ER, Benjamin EJ, Arnett DK, Mosley TH
JournalAm J Cardiol
Volume99
Issue10
Pagination1413-20
Date Published2007 May 15
ISSN0002-9149
KeywordsAfrican Americans, Aged, Atherosclerosis, Case-Control Studies, Cause of Death, Coronary Disease, Echocardiography, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular, Male, Middle Aged, Mississippi, Prospective Studies, Regression Analysis, Research Design, Risk Factors, Sex Factors, Survival Analysis, Ventricular Remodeling
Abstract

Published studies of the prognostic value of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and LV geometric pattern in African-Americans were based on referred or hospitalized patients with hypertension or coronary heart disease. All-cause mortality rates and survival associated with LV geometric pattern were determined using echocardiography in a population-based sample of middle-aged and elderly African-American men and women. During the third (1993 to 1995) visit of the ARIC Study, echocardiography was performed at the Jackson, Mississippi, field center on the cohort of 2,445 African-Americans aged 49 to 75 years. M-Mode LV echocardiographic measurements were available for 1,722 persons. Mortality data were available through December 31, 2003. During the follow-up period (median 8.8 years, maximum 10.4), 160 deaths were identified. In men, multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for all-cause mortality (compared with men with normal LV geometry) were 1.75 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.71 to 4.33) in those with concentric LV hypertrophy, 0.38 (95% CI 0.08 to 1.88) in those with eccentric LV hypertrophy, and 0.79 (95% CI 0.41 to 1.54) in those with concentric remodeling. In women, multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for all-cause mortality (compared with women with normal LV geometry) were 1.17 (95% CI 0.48 to 2.84) in those with concentric LV hypertrophy, 1.23 (95% CI 0.46 to 3.28) in those with eccentric LV hypertrophy, and 1.17 (95% CI 0.60 to 2.28) in those with concentric remodeling. In conclusion, in this population-based cohort of middle-aged and elderly African-Americans free of coronary heart disease, adjustment for baseline differences in cardiovascular disease risk factors and LV mass greatly attenuated the strength of the association between LV pattern and all-cause mortality risk in women. In men, an association between concentric LV hypertrophy and mortality risk remained.

DOI10.1016/j.amjcard.2006.12.065
Alternate JournalAm J Cardiol
PubMed ID17493471
PubMed Central IDPMC2713720
Grant ListN01HC55020 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC 95172 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC 55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55018 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC 55021 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC 95171 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55022 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55015 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC095171 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC 55022 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC 55019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC95170 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC 55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55016 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC 55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55019 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC95171 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55021 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC 55020 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC95172 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC 97570 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States