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Low birth weight and markers of inflammation and endothelial activation in adulthood: the ARIC study.

TitleLow birth weight and markers of inflammation and endothelial activation in adulthood: the ARIC study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsPellanda LC, Duncan BB, Vigo A, Rose K, Folsom AR, Erlinger TP
Corporate AuthorsARIC Investigators
JournalInt J Cardiol
Volume134
Issue3
Pagination371-7
Date Published2009 May 29
ISSN1874-1754
KeywordsAge Factors, Atherosclerosis, Biomarkers, Cohort Studies, Endothelium, Vascular, Factor VIII, Female, Humans, Infant, Low Birth Weight, Infant, Newborn, Inflammation, Leukocyte Count, Male, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Residence Characteristics, Risk Factors, Vasculitis
Abstract

BACKGROUND: To investigate the hypothesis that intrauterine growth restriction might produce a longstanding pro-inflammatory tendency, we investigated the association of low birth weight with blood levels of markers of inflammation and endothelial activation in middle-aged adults.

METHODS: The ARIC Study enrolled subjects aged 45-64 years sampled from four U.S. communities. An inflammation/endothelial activation score from 0 to 6 was created, one point being given for each above-median value of white blood cell count, fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor and Factor VIII, and for each below-median value of albumin and activated partial thromboplastin time.

RESULTS: Of the 9809 individuals reporting birth weight and having all inflammation/endothelial markers and covariates, 349 (3.6%) reported low birth weight (LBW). The mean (standard deviation) score was 3.5 (1.5) for those with and 3.1 (1.6) for those without LBW (p or =4 points) (RR=1.16, 95% CI: 1.05-1.29).

CONCLUSION: In the ARIC Study, LBW predicted greater inflammation and endothelial activation, as indicated by the higher score of blood markers, consistent with the hypothesis that early life events may result in a hyper-responsive innate immune system. Such a pro-inflammatory tendency could help explain the association of low birth weight with elements of the metabolic syndrome and ischemic heart disease.

DOI10.1016/j.ijcard.2008.02.024
Alternate JournalInt J Cardiol
PubMed ID18585798
PubMed Central IDPMC4682734
Grant ListN01HC55020 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55018 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55022 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55022 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55021 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55015 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC055019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55020 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55016 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55019 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55021 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States