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Individual and neighborhood socioeconomic status characteristics and prevalence of metabolic syndrome: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.

TitleIndividual and neighborhood socioeconomic status characteristics and prevalence of metabolic syndrome: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2008
AuthorsChichlowska KL, Rose KM, Diez-Roux AV, Golden SH, McNeill AM, Heiss G
JournalPsychosom Med
Volume70
Issue9
Pagination986-92
Date Published2008 Nov
ISSN1534-7796
KeywordsAlcohol Drinking, Atherosclerosis, Continental Population Groups, Educational Status, Female, Humans, Income, Male, Metabolic Syndrome, Middle Aged, Motor Activity, Prevalence, Residence Characteristics, Risk Factors, Sex Factors, Smoking, Socioeconomic Factors, United States
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to examine the association of individual socioeconomic status (iSES) and neighborhood SES (nSES) on the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (1987-1999).

METHODS: Participants included 2932 black and 9777 white men and women aged 45 to 64 years without diabetes at baseline. Total combined family income for the past 12 months and six census tract socioeconomic measures combined into a composite index were used to quantify iSES and nSES, respectively. Poisson regression was used to assess associations of the joint contribution of iSES and nSES on the MetS, stratified by gender and race and adjusting for multiple covariates. For analyses that included nSES, hierarchical modeling techniques were used.

RESULTS: Using 2005 Third Report of the Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults criteria, MetS was identified in 40% of black women, 30% of white women, 28% of black men, and 35% of white men. Among black and white men, there was no association between MetS and iSES or nSES. In contrast, after adjustment for risk factors, black and white women with low (L)-iSES and medium (M)-iSES were more likely to have MetS than those with high (H)-iSES. Similar but weaker patterns were noted for L-nSES and M-nSES.

CONCLUSIONS: In summary, both iSES and nSES were independently associated with an increased prevalence of MetS among women but not men. Efforts aimed at understanding the causes of these gender differences may offer insight into avenues for reducing the prevalence of the MetS and its chronic disease sequelae.

DOI10.1097/PSY.0b013e318183a491
Alternate JournalPsychosom Med
PubMed ID18799428
PubMed Central IDPMC2993075
Grant ListN01-55016 / / PHS HHS / United States
R01 HL064142 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01-HL064142 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL080287-02 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL080287-03 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-55019 / / PHS HHS / United States
N01-55015 / / PHS HHS / United States
1R01HL080287 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL080287-01S1 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL080287-04 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL080287 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-55022 / / PHS HHS / United States
N01-55021 / / PHS HHS / United States
R01 HL080287-01 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-55018 / / PHS HHS / United States
N01-55020 / / PHS HHS / United States