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Incident heart failure is associated with lower whole-grain intake and greater high-fat dairy and egg intake in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.

TitleIncident heart failure is associated with lower whole-grain intake and greater high-fat dairy and egg intake in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2008
AuthorsNettleton JA, Steffen LM, Loehr LR, Rosamond WD, Folsom AR
JournalJ Am Diet Assoc
Volume108
Issue11
Pagination1881-7
Date Published2008 Nov
ISSN0002-8223
KeywordsAfrican Americans, Atherosclerosis, Cohort Studies, Dairy Products, Diet, Diet Surveys, Dietary Fats, Edible Grain, Eggs, European Continental Ancestry Group, Exercise, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Heart Failure, Humans, Incidence, Male, Meat, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Odds Ratio, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Smoking, Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Prospective studies evaluating associations between food intake and risk of heart failure (HF) in diverse populations are needed.

OBJECTIVES: Relationships between incident HF (death or hospitalization) and intake of seven food categories (whole grains, fruits/vegetables, fish, nuts, high-fat dairy, eggs, red meat) were investigated in an observational cohort of 14,153 African-American and white adults, age 45 to 64 years, sampled from four US communities.

METHODS: Between baseline (1987-1989) and Exam 3 (1993-1995), dietary intake was based on responses to a 66-item food frequency questionnaire administered at baseline; thereafter, intake was based on averaged baseline and Exam 3 responses. Hazard ratios (HR [95% CI]) for HF were calculated per 1-daily serving difference in food group intake.

RESULTS: During a mean of 13 years, 1,140 HF hospitalizations were identified. After multivariable adjustment (energy intake, demographics, lifestyle factors, prevalent cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension), HF risk was lower with greater whole-grain intake (0.93 [0.87, 0.99]), but HF risk was higher with greater intake of eggs (1.23 [1.08, 1.41]) and high-fat dairy (1.08 [1.01, 1.16]). These associations remained significant independent of intakes of the five other food categories, which were not associated with HF.

CONCLUSIONS: In this large, population-based sample of African-American and white adults, whole-grain intake was associated with lower HF risk, whereas intake of eggs and high-fat dairy were associated with greater HF risk after adjustment for several confounders.

DOI10.1016/j.jada.2008.08.015
Alternate JournalJ Am Diet Assoc
PubMed ID18954578
PubMed Central IDPMC2650810
Grant ListN01HC55020 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55018 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55022 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL073366 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55022 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55021 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55015 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC055019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007779 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55020 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55016 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55019 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HL73366 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55021 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL07779 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States