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Longitudinal impact of physical activity on lipid profiles in middle-aged adults: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

TitleLongitudinal impact of physical activity on lipid profiles in middle-aged adults: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsMonda KL, Ballantyne CM, North KE
JournalJ Lipid Res
Volume50
Issue8
Pagination1685-91
Date Published2009 Aug
ISSN1539-7262
KeywordsAfrican Americans, Atherosclerosis, Body Mass Index, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cholesterol, Cholesterol, HDL, Cholesterol, LDL, European Continental Ancestry Group, Exercise, Female, Humans, Likelihood Functions, Lipids, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Metabolic Equivalent, Middle Aged, Motor Activity, Risk Factors, Sex Factors, Sports, Surveys and Questionnaires, Triglycerides
Abstract

Evidence exists that increased levels of physical activity decrease the population burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although risk factors for CVD, including plasma lipids and lipoproteins, have been associated with physical activity, studies including a sizeable number of minority participants are lacking. Our purpose was to interrogate the longitudinal effect of physical activity on plasma lipids and lipoproteins in the African American and white participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Nine years of follow-up data on 8,764 individuals aged 45-64 years at baseline were used in linear mixed-effects models to estimate the association between increases in baseline physical activity on mean change in HDL, LDL, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. Increases in the level of activity were associated with increases in HDL in all strata and decreases in triglycerides among white participants. Physical activity was associated with LDL in all women, while the association with total cholesterol was limited to African American women. This study is one of the few to investigate the effect of physical activity on lipids and lipoproteins in a race- and sex-specific manner. Overall our results highlight the importance of physical activity on plasma lipid profiles and provide evidence for novel differential associations.

DOI10.1194/jlr.P900029-JLR200
Alternate JournalJ Lipid Res
PubMed ID19346332
PubMed Central IDPMC2724055
Grant ListN01-HC-55022 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55021 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55020 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 H2-0007055 / / PHS HHS / United States