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Risk of dementia hospitalisation associated with cardiovascular risk factors in midlife and older age: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.

TitleRisk of dementia hospitalisation associated with cardiovascular risk factors in midlife and older age: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsAlonso A, Mosley TH, Gottesman RF, Catellier D, Sharrett AR, Coresh J
JournalJ Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry
Volume80
Issue11
Pagination1194-201
Date Published2009 Nov
ISSN1468-330X
KeywordsAfrican Americans, Age Factors, Aged, Cardiovascular Diseases, Dementia, Diabetes Complications, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Hospitalization, Humans, Hypertension, Male, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Smoking
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular risk factors are associated with a higher risk of developing dementia. Studies in older populations, however, have often failed to show this relationship. We assessed the association between cardiovascular risk factors measured in midlife and risk of being hospitalised with dementia and determined whether this association was modified by age and ethnicity.

METHODS: We studied 11 151 participants in the population-based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities cohort, aged 46-70 (23% African-Americans) in 1990-2, when participants underwent a physical exam and cognitive testing. Hospitalisations with dementia were ascertained through December 2004.

RESULTS: During follow-up, 203 cases of hospitalisation with dementia were identified. Smoking (hazard ratio (HR), 95% CI 1.7, 1.2 to 2.5), hypertension (HR, 95% CI 1.6, 1.2 to 2.2) and diabetes (HR, 95% CI 2.2, 1.6 to 3.0) were strongly associated with dementia, in Caucasians and African-Americans. These associations were stronger when risk factors were measured at a younger age than at an older age. In analyses including updated information on risk factors during follow-up, the HR of dementia in hypertensive versus non-hypertensive participants was 1.8 at age or=70), smoking (4.8 in or=70) and hypercholesterolaemia (HR 1.7 in or=70)

CONCLUSION: In this prospective study, smoking, hypertension and diabetes were strongly associated with subsequent risk of hospitalisation with dementia, particularly in middle-aged individuals. Our results emphasise the importance of early lifestyle modification and risk factor treatment to prevent dementia.

DOI10.1136/jnnp.2009.176818
Alternate JournalJ Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry
PubMed ID19692426
PubMed Central IDPMC2783764
Grant ListN01HC55020 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC055022 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55018 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55022 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC055018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55022 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55021 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55015 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC055019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55020 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55016 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC055015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC055021 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55019 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC055020 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55021 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC055016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States