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Life course socioeconomic conditions and metabolic syndrome in adults: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.

TitleLife course socioeconomic conditions and metabolic syndrome in adults: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsChichlowska KL, Rose KM, Diez-Roux AV, Golden SH, McNeill AM, Heiss G
JournalAnn Epidemiol
Volume19
Issue12
Pagination875-83
Date Published2009 Dec
ISSN1873-2585
KeywordsAfrican Americans, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Health Status, Humans, Male, Maryland, Metabolic Syndrome, Middle Aged, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Poverty, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Sex Factors
Abstract

PURPOSE: This study examined the effect of childhood, adulthood, and cumulative socioeconomic status (cumSES) on the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in middle-aged adults in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (1987-1989).

METHODS: Participants included 2,461 black and 8,536 white men and women 45 to 64 years of age without diabetes. Socioeconomic status (SES) measures from childhood, early adulthood, and mature adulthood were used to create a cumSES score. Childhood SES, early adult SES, mature adult SES and cumSES scores were grouped into two categories (high/low). Age- and center-adjusted prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals for MetS, using the Third Report of the Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (ATP III) criteria, by SES were estimated by log-linear regression for race-sex groups.

RESULTS: Black and white women with low childhood SES, early adult SES, mature adult SES or cumSES were more likely to have the MetS than those with high SES. These associations remained after adjustment for physical activity, smoking status, and drinking status. In contrast, there was no association of SES with MetS in men.

CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that socioeconomic disadvantage early in life and across the life course influences risk of the MetS in black and white women.

DOI10.1016/j.annepidem.2009.07.094
Alternate JournalAnn Epidemiol
PubMed ID19804985
PubMed Central IDPMC2828037
Grant ListN01-55016 / / PHS HHS / United States
R01 HL064142 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01-HL064142 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK079637 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01-55019 / / PHS HHS / United States
N01-55015 / / PHS HHS / United States
R01 HL080287-01S1 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL080287 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-55022 / / PHS HHS / United States
N01-55021 / / PHS HHS / United States
N01-55018 / / PHS HHS / United States
N01-55020 / / PHS HHS / United States
1R01HL080287-01S1 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States