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Diabetes and the risk of sudden cardiac death, the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study.

TitleDiabetes and the risk of sudden cardiac death, the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsKucharska-Newton AM, Couper DJ, Pankow JS, Prineas RJ, Rea TD, Sotoodehnia N, Chakravarti A, Folsom AR, Siscovick DS, Rosamond WD
JournalActa Diabetol
Volume47 Suppl 1
Pagination161-8
Date Published2010 Dec
ISSN1432-5233
KeywordsAged, Atherosclerosis, Cohort Studies, Death, Sudden, Cardiac, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Residence Characteristics, Risk Factors, United States
Abstract

Studies suggest that diabetes may specifically elevate the risk of sudden cardiac death in excess of other heart disease outcomes. In this study, we examined the association of type 2 diabetes with the incidence of sudden cardiac death when compared to the incidence of non-sudden cardiac death and non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI). We used data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study to examine the incidence of sudden and non-sudden cardiac death and non-fatal MI among persons with and without diabetes in follow-up from the baseline data collection (1987-1989) through December 31, 2001. There were 209 cases of sudden cardiac death, 119 of non-sudden cardiac death, and 739 of non-fatal MI identified in this cohort over an average 12.4 years of follow-up. In analyses adjusted for age, race/ARIC center, gender, and smoking, the Cox proportional hazard ratio of the association of baseline diabetes was 3.77 (95% CI 2.82, 5.05) for sudden cardiac death, 3.78 (95% CI 2.57, 5.53) for non-sudden cardiac death, and 3.20 (95% CI 2.71, 3.78) for non-fatal MI. Elevated risk for each of the three outcomes associated with diabetes was independent of adjustment for measures of blood pressure, lipids, inflammation, hemostasis, and renal function. Among those with diabetes, the risk of cardiac death, but not of non-fatal MI, was similar for men and women. Findings from this prospective, population-based cohort investigation indicate that diabetes does not confer a specific excess risk of sudden cardiac death. Our results suggest that diabetes attenuates gender differences in the risk of fatal cardiac events.

DOI10.1007/s00592-009-0157-9
Alternate JournalActa Diabetol
PubMed ID19855920
PubMed Central IDPMC3064263
Grant ListN01HC55020 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55018 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007055-34 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55022 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC055018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55022 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55021 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55015 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55020 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55016 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55019 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55021 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 H2-0007055 / / PHS HHS / United States
T32 HL007055 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States