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Sugar-sweetened soda consumption, hyperuricemia, and kidney disease.

TitleSugar-sweetened soda consumption, hyperuricemia, and kidney disease.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsBomback AS, Derebail VK, Shoham DA, Anderson CA, Steffen LM, Rosamond WD, Kshirsagar AV
JournalKidney Int
Volume77
Issue7
Pagination609-16
Date Published2010 Apr
ISSN1523-1755
KeywordsCarbonated Beverages, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Fructose, Humans, Hyperuricemia, Kidney Diseases, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Sweetening Agents, United States
Abstract

The metabolism of high-fructose corn syrup used to sweeten soda drinks may lead to elevations in uric acid levels. Here we determined whether soda drinking is associated with hyperuricemia and, as a potential consequence, reduced kidney function. At baseline, 15,745 patients in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study completed a dietary questionnaire and had measurements of their serum creatinine and uric acid. After 3 and 9 years of follow-up, multivariate odds ratios from logistic regressions for binary outcome of hyperuricemia and chronic kidney disease (eGFR less than 60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) were evaluated. Compared to participants who drank less, consumption of over one soda per day was associated with increased odds of prevalent hyperuricemia and chronic kidney disease. The odds ratio for chronic kidney disease significantly increased to 2.59 among participants who drank more than one soda per day and had a serum uric acid level over 9.0 mg/dl. In longitudinal analyses, however, drinking more than one soda per day was not associated with hyperuricemia or chronic kidney disease. Neither preexistent hyperuricemia nor development of hyperuricemia modified the lack of association between soda drinking and incident chronic kidney disease. Thus our study shows that high consumption of sugar-sweetened soda was associated with prevalent but not incident hyperuricemia and chronic kidney disease.

DOI10.1038/ki.2009.500
Alternate JournalKidney Int
PubMed ID20032963
PubMed Central IDPMC3299001
Grant ListN01HC55020 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
UL1RR025005 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55018 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01HL59367 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
UL1 RR025005 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
T32 DK007750 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55022 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL059367 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL086694 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268200625226C / / PHS HHS / United States
U01 HG004402 / HG / NHGRI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55022 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55021 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55015 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01HG004402 / HG / NHGRI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01HL087641 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55020 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55016 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55019 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55021 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL087641 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 DK007750-14 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
R01HL086694 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States