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Long-term association between self-reported signs and symptoms and heart failure hospitalizations: the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities (ARIC) Study.

TitleLong-term association between self-reported signs and symptoms and heart failure hospitalizations: the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities (ARIC) Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsAvery CL, Mills KT, Chambless LE, Chang PP, Folsom AR, Mosley TH, Ni H, Rosamond WD, Wagenknecht L, Wood J, Heiss G
JournalEur J Heart Fail
Volume12
Issue3
Pagination232-8
Date Published2010 Mar
ISSN1879-0844
KeywordsAfrican Americans, Cohort Studies, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Health Status Indicators, Heart Failure, Hospitalization, Humans, Incidence, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Male, Middle Aged, Population Surveillance, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Self-Assessment, Surveys and Questionnaires, Time Factors, United States
Abstract

AIMS: Although studies of the accuracy of heart failure (HF) classification scoring systems are available, few have examined their performance when restricted to self-reported items.

METHODS AND RESULTS: We evaluated the association between a simplified version of the Gothenburg score, a validated HF score comprised of cardiac and pulmonary signs and symptoms and medication use, and incident HF hospitalizations in 15,430 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study participants. Gothenburg scores (range: 0-3) were constructed using self-reported items obtained at study baseline (1987-89). Incident HF hospitalization over 14.7 years of follow-up was defined as the first identified hospitalization with an ICD-9 discharge code of 428 (n = 1,668). Self-reported Gothenburg scores demonstrated very high agreement with the original metric comprised of self-reported and clinical measures and were directly associated with incident HF hospitalizations: [score = 1: hazard rate ratio (HRR) = 1.23 (1.07-1.42); score = 2: HRR = 2.17 (1.92-2.43); score = 3: HRR = 3.98 (3.37-4.70)].

CONCLUSION: In a population-based cohort, self-reported Gothenburg criteria items were associated with hospitalized HF over a prolonged follow-up time. The association was also consistent across groups defined by sex and race, suggesting that this simple score deserves further study as a screening tool for the identification of individuals at high risk of HF in resource-limited settings.

DOI10.1093/eurjhf/hfp203
Alternate JournalEur J Heart Fail
PubMed ID20097681
PubMed Central IDPMC2821798
Grant ListN01-HC-55022 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55021 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55020 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States