Pulse lineResearch With Heart Logo

Vital exhaustion as a risk factor for adverse cardiac events (from the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities [ARIC] study).

TitleVital exhaustion as a risk factor for adverse cardiac events (from the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities [ARIC] study).
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsWilliams JE, Mosley TH, Kop WJ, Couper DJ, Welch VL, Rosamond WD
JournalAm J Cardiol
Volume105
Issue12
Pagination1661-5
Date Published2010 Jun 15
ISSN1879-1913
KeywordsAged, Atherosclerosis, Fatigue, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Heart Diseases, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Surveys and Questionnaires, Survival Rate, Time Factors, United States
Abstract

Vital exhaustion, defined as excessive fatigue, feelings of demoralization, and increased irritability, has been identified as a risk factor for incident and recurrent cardiac events, but there are no population-based prospective studies of this association in US samples. We examined the predictive value of vital exhaustion for incident myocardial infarction or fatal coronary heart disease in middle-aged men and women in 4 US communities. Participants were 12,895 black or white men and women enrolled in the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities (ARIC) study cohort and followed for the occurrence of cardiac morbidity and mortality from 1990 through 2002 (maximum follow-up 13.0 years). Vital exhaustion was assessed using the 21-item Maastricht Questionnaire and scores were partitioned into approximate quartiles for statistical analyses. High vital exhaustion (fourth quartile) predicted adverse cardiac events in age-, gender-, and race-center-adjusted analyses (1.69, 95% confidence interval 1.40 to 2.05) and in analyses further adjusted for educational level, body mass index, plasma low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels, diabetes mellitus, cigarette smoking status, and pack-years of cigarette smoking (1.46, 95% confidence interval 1.20 to 1.79). Risk for adverse cardiac events increased monotonically from the first through the fourth quartile of vital exhaustion. Probabilities of adverse cardiac events over time were significantly higher in people with high vital exhaustion compared to those with low exhaustion (p = 0.002). In conclusion, vital exhaustion predicts long-term risk for adverse cardiac events in men and women, independent of established biomedical risk factors.

DOI10.1016/j.amjcard.2010.01.340
Alternate JournalAm J Cardiol
PubMed ID20538111
PubMed Central IDPMC4928631
Grant ListN01HC55020 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55018 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55022 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC055018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55022 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55021 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55015 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55020 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55016 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55019 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55021 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States