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Reliability and sensitivity of the self-report of physician-diagnosed gout in the campaign against cancer and heart disease and the atherosclerosis risk in the community cohorts.

TitleReliability and sensitivity of the self-report of physician-diagnosed gout in the campaign against cancer and heart disease and the atherosclerosis risk in the community cohorts.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsMcAdams MA, Maynard JW, Baer AN, Köttgen A, Clipp S, Coresh J, Gelber AC
JournalJ Rheumatol
Volume38
Issue1
Pagination135-41
Date Published2011 Jan
ISSN0315-162X
KeywordsAtherosclerosis, Cohort Studies, Epidemiologic Studies, Female, Gout, Heart Diseases, Humans, Male, Neoplasms, Physicians, Reproducibility of Results, Residence Characteristics, Risk Factors, Self Report, Sensitivity and Specificity, Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: gout is often defined by self-report in epidemiologic studies. Yet the validity of self-reported gout is uncertain. We evaluated the reliability and sensitivity of the self-report of physician-diagnosed gout in the Campaign Against Cancer and Heart Disease (CLUE II) and the Atherosclerosis Risk in the Community (ARIC) cohorts.

METHODS: the CLUE II cohort comprises 12,912 individuals who self-reported gout status on either the 2000, 2003, or 2007 questionnaires. We calculated reliability as the percentage of participants reporting having gout on more than 1 questionnaire using Cohen's κ statistic. The ARIC cohort comprises 11,506 individuals who self-reported gout status at visit 4. We considered a hospital discharge diagnosis of gout or use of a gout-specific medication as the standard against which to calculate the sensitivity of self-reported, physician-diagnosed gout.

RESULTS: of the 437 CLUE II participants who self-reported physician-diagnosed gout in 2000, and subsequently answered the 2003 questionnaire, 75% reported gout in 2003 (κ = 0.73). Of the 271 participants who reported gout in 2000, 73% again reported gout at the 2007 followup questionnaire (κ = 0.63). In ARIC, 196 participants met the definition for gout prior to visit 4 and self-reported their gout status at visit 4. The sensitivity of a self-report of physician-diagnosed gout was 84%. Accuracy was similar across sex and race subgroups, but differed across hyperuricemia and education strata.

CONCLUSION: these 2 population-based US cohorts suggest that self-report of physician-diagnosed gout has good reliability and sensitivity. Thus, self-report of a physician diagnosis of gout is appropriate for epidemiologic studies.

DOI10.3899/jrheum.100418
Alternate JournalJ Rheumatol
PubMed ID21123328
PubMed Central IDPMC3285109
Grant ListN01HC55020 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55018 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55022 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007024 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
1KL2RR025006-01 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
U01 AG18033 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55022 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55021 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55015 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007024-35 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
KL2 RR025006 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
5T32HL007024 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55020 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55016 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55019 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 CA105069 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55021 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 AG018033 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States