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Socioeconomic indicators and the risk of acute coronary heart disease events: comparison of population-based data from the United States and Finland.

TitleSocioeconomic indicators and the risk of acute coronary heart disease events: comparison of population-based data from the United States and Finland.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsKucharska-Newton AM, Harald K, Rosamond WD, Rose KM, Rea TD, Salomaa V
JournalAnn Epidemiol
Volume21
Issue8
Pagination572-9
Date Published2011 Aug
ISSN1873-2585
KeywordsAdult, Cohort Studies, Coronary Disease, Death, Death, Sudden, Cardiac, Female, Finland, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Myocardial Infarction, Poverty, Risk Factors, Social Class, United States
Abstract

PURPOSE: We wished to determine whether a gradient of association of low socioeconomic status with incidence of coronary heart disease was present in two population-based cohorts, one from United States and the other from Finland.

METHODS: Using data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) cohort and the Finnish FINRISK cohort, we estimated, with Cox proportional hazard regression models, incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD), non-sudden cardiac death (NSCD), and non-fatal myocardial infarction (NFMI) for strata of income and education (follow-up: 1987-2001). In both cohorts, incidence rates of the three outcomes increased across all socioeconomic status exposure categories.

RESULTS: Low education was associated with increased hazard of NFMI in both cohorts and with increased risk of SCD among ARIC women. Low income was significantly associated with increased hazard of all three outcomes among ARIC women and with increased hazard of cardiac death among ARIC men. In FINRISK, low income was significantly associated with increased risk of SCD only. Risk of SCD in the low income categories was similar for both cohorts. Smoking, alcohol consumption, and race (ARIC only) did not appreciably alter effect estimates in either cohort.

CONCLUSIONS: Indices of low SES show similar associations with increased risk of cardiac events in Finland and in United States.

DOI10.1016/j.annepidem.2011.04.006
Alternate JournalAnn Epidemiol
PubMed ID21737046
PubMed Central IDPMC3132397
Grant ListN01HC55020 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55018 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55022 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55022 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55021 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55015 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55020 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55016 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55019 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55021 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 H2-0007055 / / PHS HHS / United States
T32 HL007055 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007055-33 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States