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No interactions between previously associated 2-hour glucose gene variants and physical activity or BMI on 2-hour glucose levels.

TitleNo interactions between previously associated 2-hour glucose gene variants and physical activity or BMI on 2-hour glucose levels.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsScott RA, Chu AY, Grarup N, et al.
Secondary AuthorsLangenberg C
JournalDiabetes
Volume61
Issue5
Pagination1291-6
Date Published2012 May
ISSN1939-327X
KeywordsBlood Glucose, Body Mass Index, Epigenesis, Genetic, Gene Expression Regulation, Genotype, Humans, Life Style, Motor Activity, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Abstract

Gene-lifestyle interactions have been suggested to contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes. Glucose levels 2 h after a standard 75-g glucose challenge are used to diagnose diabetes and are associated with both genetic and lifestyle factors. However, whether these factors interact to determine 2-h glucose levels is unknown. We meta-analyzed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) × BMI and SNP × physical activity (PA) interaction regression models for five SNPs previously associated with 2-h glucose levels from up to 22 studies comprising 54,884 individuals without diabetes. PA levels were dichotomized, with individuals below the first quintile classified as inactive (20%) and the remainder as active (80%). BMI was considered a continuous trait. Inactive individuals had higher 2-h glucose levels than active individuals (β = 0.22 mmol/L [95% CI 0.13-0.31], P = 1.63 × 10(-6)). All SNPs were associated with 2-h glucose (β = 0.06-0.12 mmol/allele, P ≤ 1.53 × 10(-7)), but no significant interactions were found with PA (P > 0.18) or BMI (P ≥ 0.04). In this large study of gene-lifestyle interaction, we observed no interactions between genetic and lifestyle factors, both of which were associated with 2-h glucose. It is perhaps unlikely that top loci from genome-wide association studies will exhibit strong subgroup-specific effects, and may not, therefore, make the best candidates for the study of interactions.

DOI10.2337/db11-0973
Alternate JournalDiabetes
PubMed ID22415877
PubMed Central IDPMC3331745
Grant ListMC_UP_A620_1015 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
MC_UP_A100_1003 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
G19/35 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
G0100222 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
T32 HL007575 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
G8802774 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
R01 DK072041 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
G0902037 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
UL1 RR025741 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
MC_U106179473 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
UL1 TR000124 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
MC_UP_A620_1014 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
MC_U106179471 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
P30 DK063491 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
G1002084 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
G0701863 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
K24 DK080140 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
UL1 RR024148 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK020572 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
MC_U147585824 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
RG/07/008/23674 / / British Heart Foundation / United Kingdom