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Racial differences in association of elevated interleukin-18 levels with type 2 diabetes: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study.

TitleRacial differences in association of elevated interleukin-18 levels with type 2 diabetes: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsNegi SI, Pankow JS, Fernstrom K, Hoogeveen RC, Zhu N, Couper DJ, Schmidt MI, Duncan BB
Secondary AuthorsBallantyne CM
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume35
Issue7
Pagination1513-8
Date Published2012 Jul
ISSN1935-5548
KeywordsAfrican Americans, Cohort Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Incidence, Interleukin-18, Male, Middle Aged, Risk, United States
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Elevated plasma interleukin-18 (IL-18) has been linked to onset of diabetes mellitus (DM) and its complications. However, so far this association has been shown only in predominantly white populations. We examined IL-18 levels and their association with incident DM in a racially heterogeneous population.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In a nested case-cohort design representing a 9-year follow-up of 9,740 middle-aged, initially healthy, nondiabetic white and African American participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, we selected and measured analytes on race-stratified (50% white, 50% African American) random samples of both cases of incident diabetes (n = 548) and eligible members of the full cohort (n = 536). RESULTS Baseline IL-18 levels were significantly higher in white participants compared with African American participants (P

CONCLUSIONS: There are racial differences in levels of IL-18 and the association of IL-18 with risk factors and incident type 2 DM. In addition, there seems to be a complex interplay of inflammation and adiposity in the development of DM.

DOI10.2337/dc11-1957
Alternate JournalDiabetes Care
PubMed ID22596175
PubMed Central IDPMC3379601
Grant ListHHSN268201100012C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN2682011000010C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005G / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01-DK-56918 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
HHSN2682011000012C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / / PHS HHS / United States
R01 DK056918 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
HHSN2682011000011C / / PHS HHS / United States