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Alternative markers of hyperglycemia and risk of diabetes.

TitleAlternative markers of hyperglycemia and risk of diabetes.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsJuraschek SP, Steffes MW, Miller ER
Secondary AuthorsSelvin E
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume35
Issue11
Pagination2265-70
Date Published2012 Nov
ISSN1935-5548
KeywordsAged, Biomarkers, Blood Glucose, Deoxyglucose, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Fructosamine, Glycated Hemoglobin A, Humans, Hyperglycemia, Male, Proportional Hazards Models, Risk Factors, Serum Albumin
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Fructosamine, glycated albumin, and 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG) are of interest for monitoring short-term glycemic control in patients with diabetes; however, their associations with diabetes risk are uncharacterized.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We used Cox proportional hazards models to examine the associations of fructosamine, glycated albumin, and 1,5-AG with incident diabetes in 1,299 participants, from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study (2005-2006), who had no history of diagnosed diabetes at baseline. Incident diabetes was self-reported during annual telephone calls.

RESULTS: There were 119 new cases of diabetes during a median follow-up of 3.3 years. When compared with the lowest quartile, the fourth quartiles of fructosamine and glycated albumin were significantly associated with diabetes risk (hazard ratio [HR] 3.99 [95% CI 1.93-8.28] and 5.22 [2.49-10.94], respectively). The fourth quartile of 1,5-AG was associated with a significantly lower diabetes risk (0.27 [0.14-0.55]). Associations were attenuated but still significant after adjustment for hemoglobin A(1c) (A1C) or fasting glucose.

CONCLUSIONS: Fructosamine, glycated albumin, and 1,5-AG were associated with the subsequent development of diabetes independently of baseline A1C and fasting glucose. Our results suggest these alternative biomarkers may be useful in identifying persons at risk for diabetes.

DOI10.2337/dc12-0787
Alternate JournalDiabetes Care
PubMed ID22875225
PubMed Central IDPMC3476908
Grant ListHHSN268201100012C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005G / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / / PHS HHS / United States
R01 DK089174 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / / PHS HHS / United States
R01DK089174 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 HL075572 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007024 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / / PHS HHS / United States
K01 DK076595 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100012C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32HL007024 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01HL075572-01 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / / PHS HHS / United States