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Serum and dietary magnesium and incidence of atrial fibrillation in whites and in African Americans--Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.

TitleSerum and dietary magnesium and incidence of atrial fibrillation in whites and in African Americans--Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsMisialek JR, Norby FL, Lutsey PL, Huxley RR, Peacock JM, Chen LYee, Soliman EZ, Agarwal SK
Secondary AuthorsAlonso A
JournalCirc J
Volume77
Issue2
Pagination323-9
Date Published2013
ISSN1347-4820
KeywordsAfrican Americans, Atherosclerosis, Atrial Fibrillation, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Incidence, Magnesium, Male, Middle Aged, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Residence Characteristics, Risk Factors, Sex Distribution, United States
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Low serum magnesium (Mg) has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), including ventricular arrhythmias, but the association between serum or dietary Mg and atrial fibrillation (AF) has not been investigated.

METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 14,290 men and women (75% white; 53% female; mean age, 54 years) free of AF at baseline participating in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study in the United States, were studied. Incident AF cases through 2009 were ascertained from electrocardiograms, hospital discharge codes, and death certificates. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for AF associated with serum and dietary Mg quintiles. Over a median follow-up time of 20.6 years, 1,755 incident AF cases were identified. In multivariate models, lower serum Mg was associated with higher AF risk: compared to individuals in the middle quintile (≥ 0.80-0.83 mmol/L), the HR (95% CI) of AF in quintiles 1, 2, 4, and 5 were 1.34 (1.16-1.54), 0.99 (0.85-1.16), 1.04 (0.90-1.22), and 1.06 (0.91-1.23), respectively. There was no evidence of significant interactions between serum Mg and sex or race. No association between dietary Mg and AF risk was observed.

CONCLUSIONS: Lower serum Mg was associated with a higher AF risk, and this association was not different between whites and African Americans. Dietary Mg was not associated with AF risk.

DOI10.1253/circj.cj-12-0886
Alternate JournalCirc J
PubMed ID23047297
PubMed Central IDPMC4228988
Grant ListHHSN268201100012C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL103706 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01-HL103706S1 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005G / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
RC1 HL099452 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
RC1-HL099452 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States