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Diabetes medication use and blood lactate level among participants with type 2 diabetes: the atherosclerosis risk in communities carotid MRI study.

TitleDiabetes medication use and blood lactate level among participants with type 2 diabetes: the atherosclerosis risk in communities carotid MRI study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsMongraw-Chaffin ML, Matsushita K, Brancati FL, Astor BC, Coresh JJ, Crawford SO, Schmidt M I, Hoogeveen RC, Ballantyne CM
Secondary AuthorsYoung J H
JournalPLoS One
Volume7
Issue12
Paginatione51237
Date Published2012
ISSN1932-6203
KeywordsAged, Aged, 80 and over, Atherosclerosis, Blood Glucose, Cohort Studies, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diabetes Complications, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Glycated Hemoglobin A, Humans, Hypoglycemic Agents, Insulin, Lactic Acid, Male, Metformin, Middle Aged, Risk Factors, Thiazolidinediones
Abstract

BACKGROUND: The objective of this study is to compare lactate levels between users and non-users of diabetes medications under the hypothesis that the level of lactate is a marker of oxidative capacity.

METHODS: The cross-sectional data of 493 participants aged 61-84 with type 2 diabetes who participated in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Carotid MRI study were analyzed using survey weighted linear regression.

RESULTS: Median plasma lactate level was 8.58 (95% CI: 8.23, 8.87) mg/dl. Comparing users of diabetic medications with non-users, thiazolidinedione use was significantly associated with lower lactate level (7.57 (6.95-8.25) mg/dL vs. 8.78 (8.43-9.14) mg/dL), metformin use with a slightly higher lactate level (9.02 (8.51-9.58) mg/dL vs. 8.36 (7.96-8.77) mg/dL), and sulfonylurea and insulin use were not associated with lactate level. After adjustment for demographic and lifestyle factors, the plasma lactate level for thiazolidinedione users was 15.78% lower than that for non-users (p

CONCLUSION: In conclusion, thiazolidinedione use was associated with lower plasma lactate level compared to non-use and metformin use was only marginally associated with a slightly higher lactate level. These results are consistent with the previously demonstrated effects of diabetes medications on oxidative metabolism. Further investigation of the role that diabetes medications play in improvement of oxidative metabolism is warranted.

DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0051237
Alternate JournalPLoS One
PubMed ID23300538
PubMed Central IDPMC3530587
Grant ListP30 DK079637 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
5T32HL007024 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 DK 085458 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
U01HL075572-01 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States