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A diet pattern with more dairy and nuts, but less meat is related to lower risk of developing hypertension in middle-aged adults: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.

TitleA diet pattern with more dairy and nuts, but less meat is related to lower risk of developing hypertension in middle-aged adults: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsWeng L-C, Steffen LM, Szklo M, Nettleton J, Chambless L
Secondary AuthorsFolsom AR
JournalNutrients
Volume5
Issue5
Pagination1719-33
Date Published2013 May 21
ISSN2072-6643
KeywordsAfrican Americans, Blood Pressure, Dairy Products, Diet, European Continental Ancestry Group, Feeding Behavior, Female, Humans, Hypertension, Incidence, Life Style, Male, Meat, Middle Aged, Nuts, Proportional Hazards Models, Risk Factors
Abstract

Dietary intake among other lifestyle factors influence blood pressure. We examined the associations of an "a priori" diet score with incident high normal blood pressure (HNBP; systolic blood pressure (SBP) 120-139 mmHg, or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) 80-89 mmHg and no antihypertensive medications) and hypertension (SBP ≥ 140 mmHg, DBP ≥ 90 mmHg, or taking antihypertensive medication). We used proportional hazards regression to evaluate this score in quintiles (Q) and each food group making up the score relative to incident HNBP or hypertension over nine years in the Atherosclerosis Risk of Communities (ARIC) study of 9913 African-American and Caucasian adults aged 45-64 years and free of HNBP or hypertension at baseline. Incidence of HNBP varied from 42.5% in white women to 44.1% in black women; and incident hypertension from 26.1% in white women to 40.8% in black women. Adjusting for demographics and CVD risk factors, the "a priori" food score was inversely associated with incident hypertension; but not HNBP. Compared to Q1, the relative hazards of hypertension for the food score Q2-Q5 were 0.97 (0.87-1.09), 0.91 (0.81-1.02), 0.91 (0.80-1.03), and 0.86 (0.75-0.98); p(trend) = 0.01. This inverse relation was largely attributable to greater intake of dairy products and nuts, and less meat. These findings support the 2010 Dietary Guidelines to consume more dairy products and nuts, but suggest a reduction in meat intake.

DOI10.3390/nu5051719
Alternate JournalNutrients
PubMed ID23698164
PubMed Central IDPMC3708346
Grant ListN01HC55020 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55018 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55022 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55022 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55021 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55020 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55016 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55019 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55021 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States