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Migraine and white matter hyperintensities: the ARIC MRI study.

TitleMigraine and white matter hyperintensities: the ARIC MRI study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsHamedani AG, Rose KM, B Peterlin L, Mosley TH, Coker LH, Jack CR, Knopman DS, Alonso A
Secondary AuthorsGottesman RF
JournalNeurology
Volume81
Issue15
Pagination1308-13
Date Published2013 Oct 08
ISSN1526-632X
KeywordsAged, Brain, Cohort Studies, Cross-Sectional Studies, Disease Progression, Female, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Leukoencephalopathies, Logistic Models, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Migraine Disorders, Nerve Fibers, Myelinated, Retrospective Studies, Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Migraine is associated with white matter hyperintensities (WMH) cross-sectionally, but its effect on WMH progression is uncertain.

METHODS: Participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities cohort study (n = 10,924) completed a standardized headache questionnaire between 1993 and 1995. A subset of participants (n = 1,028) received 2 MRIs 8 to 12 years apart: once at the time of headache ascertainment, and again from 2004 to 2006. WMH were quantified using both a visually graded score (0-9) and semiautomated volumetric analysis. Linear and logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, and other vascular risk factors were constructed.

RESULTS: Individuals who had migraine without aura were cross-sectionally associated with an 87% greater odds of having a WMH score ≥3 than individuals without headache (adjusted odds ratio = 1.87; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04, 3.37). Participants with migraine had an average of 2.65 cm(3) more WMH than those without headache (95% CI: 0.06, 5.24). However, there was no significant difference in WMH progression over the study period between individuals with and without migraine (1.58 cm(3) more progression for individuals with migraine compared to those without; 95% CI: -0.37, 3.53).

CONCLUSION: Migraine is associated with WMH volume cross-sectionally but not with WMH progression over time. This suggests that the association between migraine and WMH is stable in older age and may be primarily attributable to changes occurring earlier in life, although further work is needed to confirm these findings.

DOI10.1212/WNL.0b013e3182a8235b
Alternate JournalNeurology
PubMed ID23975874
PubMed Central IDPMC3806921
Grant ListHL096899 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HL096902 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55022 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / / PHS HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HL096917 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / / PHS HHS / United States
N01HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55021 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / / PHS HHS / United States
N01-HC-55019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / / PHS HHS / United States
R01-HL70825 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100012C / / PHS HHS / United States
HL096814 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 HL096812 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55020 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / / PHS HHS / United States