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Retinol binding protein 4 and incident diabetes--the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC Study).

TitleRetinol binding protein 4 and incident diabetes--the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC Study).
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsLuft VC, Pereira M, Pankow JS, Ballantyne CM, Couper DJ, Heiss G
Secondary AuthorsDuncan BB
Corporate AuthorsARIC Investigators
JournalRev Bras Epidemiol
Volume16
Issue2
Pagination388-97
Date Published2013 Jun
ISSN1980-5497
KeywordsAfrican Americans, Atherosclerosis, Cohort Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, European Continental Ancestry Group, Fasting, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Predictive Value of Tests, Retinol-Binding Proteins, Plasma, Risk Assessment, Time Factors
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) has been described as a link between impaired glucose uptake in adipocytes and systemic insulin sensitivity.

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether RBP4 fasting levels predict the development of type 2 diabetes.

METHODS: Using a case-cohort design, we followed 543 middle-aged individuals who developed diabetes and 537 who did not over ~9 years within the population-based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Weighted Cox proportional hazards analyses permitted statistical inference of the RBP4 - incident diabetes associations to the entire cohort.

RESULTS: Women in the highest tertile of RBP4 presented greater risk of developing diabetes (HR = 1.74; 95%CI 1.03 - 2.94) in analyses adjusted for age, ethnicity, study center, parental history of diabetes, hypertension, glomerular filtration rate, body mass index, waist-hip ratio, nonesterified fatty acids, adiponectin, leptin, triglycerides and HDL-C. When additionally adjusted for fasting insulin, this association's significance became borderline (HR = 1.68; 95%CI 1.00 - 2.82). No association between RBP4 levels and incident diabetes was found in men.

CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that RBP4 levels may be directly involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes in women.

DOI10.1590/S1415-790X2013000200014
Alternate JournalRev Bras Epidemiol
PubMed ID24142010
PubMed Central IDPMC4929996
Grant ListN01HC55020 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55018 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55022 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55022 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55021 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55015 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55020 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55016 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01-DK56918 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55019 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC55021 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 DK056918 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States