Pulse lineResearch With Heart Logo

A comparative analysis of risk factors for stroke in blacks and whites: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study.

TitleA comparative analysis of risk factors for stroke in blacks and whites: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsHuxley RR, Bell EJ, Lutsey PL, Bushnell C, Shahar E, Rosamond WD, Gottesman R
Secondary AuthorsFolsom AR
JournalEthn Health
Volume19
Issue6
Pagination601-16
Date Published2014
ISSN1465-3419
KeywordsAfrican Americans, African Continental Ancestry Group, Age Distribution, Atherosclerosis, Blood Pressure, Body Mass Index, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Incidence, Interviews as Topic, Male, Middle Aged, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Residence Characteristics, Risk Factors, Sex Distribution, Socioeconomic Factors, Stroke, United States
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have speculated that the higher stroke incidence rate (IR) in blacks compared with whites may be due, in part, to stroke risk factors exerting a more adverse effect among blacks than whites. To determine whether such racial differences exist we compared the prospective associations between novel, traditional, and emerging stroke risk factors in blacks and whites.

DESIGN: Baseline characteristics on risk factor levels were obtained on 15,407 participants from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Stroke incidence was ascertained from 1987 to 2008. Adjusted Cox proportional hazard models were used to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for stroke in relation to stroke risk factor levels stratified by race.

RESULTS: During follow-up, 988 stroke events occurred: blacks had higher stroke incident rates compared with whites with the greatest difference in those aged

CONCLUSIONS: At all ages, blacks are at a considerably higher risk of incident stroke compared with whites, although the effect is most marked in younger age groups. This is most likely due to blacks having a greater burden of stroke risk factors rather than there being any substantial race differences in the associations between risk factors and stroke outcomes.

DOI10.1080/13557858.2013.857765
Alternate JournalEthn Health
PubMed ID24261746
PubMed Central IDPMC4029919
Grant ListHHSN268201100012C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005G / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / / PHS HHS / United States
T32 HL007779 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100012C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / / PHS HHS / United States