Pulse lineResearch With Heart Logo

Temporal trends in the population attributable risk for cardiovascular disease: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

TitleTemporal trends in the population attributable risk for cardiovascular disease: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsCheng S, Claggett B, Correia AW, Shah AM, Gupta DK, Skali H, Ni H, Rosamond WD, Heiss G, Folsom AR, Coresh JJ
Secondary AuthorsSolomon SD
JournalCirculation
Volume130
Issue10
Pagination820-8
Date Published2014 Sep 02
ISSN1524-4539
KeywordsAfrican Continental Ancestry Group, Aged, Cardiovascular Diseases, Continental Population Groups, Diabetes Complications, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Hypercholesterolemia, Hypertension, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Sex Factors, Smoking, United States
Abstract

BACKGROUND: The extent to which the relative contributions of traditional cardiovascular risk factors to incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) may have changed over time remains unclear.

METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied 13 541 participants (56% women, 26% black) in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, aged 52 to 66 years and free of CVD at exams in 1987 through 1989, 1990 through 1992, 1993 through 1995, or 1996 through 1998. At each examination, we estimated the population attributable risks (PAR) of traditional risk factors (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, and smoking) for the 10-year incidence of CVD. Overall, the PAR of all risk factors combined appeared to decrease from the late 1980s to the late 1990s (0.58 to 0.53). The combined PAR was higher in women than men in 1987 through 1989 (0.68 versus 0.51, P

CONCLUSIONS: The contribution to CVD of all traditional risk factors combined is greater in blacks than whites, and this difference may be increasing. The contributions of hypertension and diabetes mellitus remain especially high, in women as well as blacks. These findings underscore the continued need for individual as well as population approaches to CVD risk factor modification.

DOI10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.113.008506
Alternate JournalCirculation
PubMed ID25210095
PubMed Central IDPMC4161984
Grant ListHHSN268201100012C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K08 HL116792 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL094301 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005G / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 ES007142 / ES / NIEHS NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R00-HL-107642 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R00 HL107642 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K08-HL-116792 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K99 HL107642 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States