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Kidney measures with diabetes and hypertension on cardiovascular disease: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

TitleKidney measures with diabetes and hypertension on cardiovascular disease: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsAlexander N, Matsushita K, Sang Y, Ballew S, Mahmoodi BK, Astor BC
Secondary AuthorsCoresh JJ
JournalAm J Nephrol
Volume41
Issue4-5
Pagination409-17
Date Published2015
ISSN1421-9670
KeywordsAged, Albuminuria, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cohort Studies, Comorbidity, Coronary Disease, Creatinine, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Glomerular Filtration Rate, Heart Failure, Humans, Hypertension, Male, Middle Aged, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Risk Factors, Stroke, United States
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Whether the association of chronic kidney disease (CKD) with cardiovascular risk differs based on diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HTN) status remains unanswered.

METHODS: We investigated 11,050 participants from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (fourth examination (1996-1998)) with follow-up for cardiovascular outcomes (coronary disease, heart failure and stroke) through 2009. Using the Cox regression models, we quantified cardiovascular risk associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) in individuals with and without DM and/or HTN and assessed their interactions.

RESULTS: Individuals with DM and HTN generally had higher cardiovascular risk relative to those without at all the levels of eGFR and ACR. Cardiovascular risk increased with lower eGFR and higher ACR regardless of DM and HTN status (e.g. adjusted hazards ratio (HR) for eGFR 30-44 vs. 90-104 ml/min/1.73 m(2), 2.32 (95% CI, 1.66-3.26) in non-diabetics vs. 1.83 (1.25-2.67) in diabetics and 2.45 (2.20-5.01) in non-hypertensives vs. 1.51 (1.27-1.81) in hypertensives and corresponding adjusted HR for ACR 30-299 vs.

CONCLUSION: Although individuals with DM and HTN generally had higher cardiovascular risk relative to those without these complications, both low eGFR and high ACR were associated with cardiovascular diseases regardless of the presence or absence of DM and HTN. These findings reinforce the importance of CKD in cardiovascular outcomes.

DOI10.1159/000433450
Alternate JournalAm J Nephrol
PubMed ID26139323
PubMed Central IDPMC4550225
Grant ListHHSN268201100012C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005G / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100012C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / / PHS HHS / United States