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Validity of self-report of lipid medication use: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.

TitleValidity of self-report of lipid medication use: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsBhaskara S, Whitsel EA, Ballantyne CM
Secondary AuthorsFolsom AR
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume242
Issue2
Pagination625-9
Date Published2015 Oct
ISSN1879-1484
KeywordsAged, Aged, 80 and over, Atherosclerosis, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors, Lipids, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Predictive Value of Tests, Prevalence, Prospective Studies, Reproducibility of Results, Self Report, Sensitivity and Specificity, Surveys and Questionnaires, United States
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the validity of self-reported lipid medication use in an epidemiological study.

METHODS: We studied medication self-reports compared with inventoried lipid medication containers at the fifth visit of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study in 2011-2013 (n = 6370). To assess the validity of self-reports, we computed sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values. We used multiple logistic regression to determine whether validity varied by participant characteristics. Comparisons were made with visit 4 (n = 11,531), to determine if there was a change in validity as the pattern and types of lipid medication used changed over time.

RESULTS: The prevalence of lipid medication use, according to medication containers was higher at visit 5 (56%) than visit 4 (14.3%). Statins were increasingly used. The percentage of participants reporting use/non-use accurately was 91.8% at visit 5, lower than visit 4 (97.3%). The unadjusted kappa coefficient of agreement was 0.83 (95% CI - 0.82 to 0.85) at visit 5 and 0.89 (95% CI - 0.88 to 0.90) at visit 4. Agreement was higher, compared with their counterparts, for women, younger and more educated participants, and those using fewer total medications.

CONCLUSION: In this population sample, self-reported lipid medication use was highly accurate and therefore likely would be for similar epidemiological studies or clinical settings collecting this information.

DOI10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2015.08.026
Alternate JournalAtherosclerosis
PubMed ID26342332
PubMed Central IDPMC4575898
Grant ListHHSN268201100012C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100012C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / / PHS HHS / United States