Pulse lineResearch With Heart Logo

Midlife Alcohol Consumption and the Risk of Stroke in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

TitleMidlife Alcohol Consumption and the Risk of Stroke in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsJones SB, Loehr LR, Avery CL, Gottesman RF, Wruck L, Shahar E
Secondary AuthorsRosamond WD
JournalStroke
Volume46
Issue11
Pagination3124-30
Date Published2015 Nov
ISSN1524-4628
KeywordsAge Factors, Alcohol Drinking, Atherosclerosis, Cohort Studies, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Residence Characteristics, Risk Factors, Stroke, United States
Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Alcohol consumption is common in the United States and may confer beneficial cardiovascular effects at light-to-moderate doses. The alcohol-stroke relationship remains debated. We estimated the relationship between midlife, self-reported alcohol consumption and ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a biracial cohort.

METHODS: We examined 12,433 never and current drinkers in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study, aged 45 to 64 years at baseline. Participants self-reported usual drinks per week of beer, wine, and liquor at baseline. We used multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression to assess the association of current alcohol consumption relative to lifetime abstention with incident ischemic stroke and ICH and modification by sex-race group. We modeled alcohol intake with quadratic splines to further assess dose-response relationships.

RESULTS: One third of participants self-reported abstention, 39% and 24%, respectively, consumed ≤3 and 4 to 17 drinks/wk, and only 5% reported heavier drinking. There were 773 ischemic strokes and 81 ICH over follow-up (median≈22.6 years). For ischemic stroke, light and moderate alcohol consumption were not associated with incidence (hazard ratios, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.79-1.21; 1.06, 0.84-1.34), whereas heavier drinking was associated with a 31% increased rate relative to abstention (hazard ratios, 1.31; 95% CI, 0.92-1.86). For ICH, moderate-to-heavy (hazard ratios, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.07-3.70), but not light, consumption increased incidence.

CONCLUSIONS: Self-reported light-to-moderate alcohol consumption at midlife was not associated with reduced stroke risk compared with abstention over 20 years of follow-up in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. Heavier consumption increased the risk for both outcomes as did moderate intake for ICH.

DOI10.1161/STROKEAHA.115.010601
Alternate JournalStroke
PubMed ID26405203
PubMed Central IDPMC4725192
Grant ListHHSN268201100012C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN2682011000010C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005G / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN2682011000012C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / / PHS HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / / PHS HHS / United States
T32 HL007055 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN2682011000011C / / PHS HHS / United States