Pulse lineResearch With Heart Logo

The severity of the metabolic syndrome increases over time within individuals, independent of baseline metabolic syndrome status and medication use: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

TitleThe severity of the metabolic syndrome increases over time within individuals, independent of baseline metabolic syndrome status and medication use: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsVishnu A, Gurka MJ
Secondary AuthorsDeBoer MD
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume243
Issue1
Pagination278-85
Date Published2015 Nov
ISSN1879-1484
KeywordsAfrican Americans, Aged, Antihypertensive Agents, Atherosclerosis, Cohort Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Disease Progression, Ethnic Groups, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Hypertension, Hypoglycemic Agents, Male, Metabolic Syndrome, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Severity of Illness Index
Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The severity of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) is linked to future cardiovascular disease. However, it is unclear whether MetS severity increases among individuals followed over time.

METHODS: We assessed changes in a sex- and race/ethnicity-specific MetS severity Z-score over a 10-year period (visits 1-4) among 9291 participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study cohort. We compared sex- and racial/ethnic subgroups for the rate of change in the MetS severity score and MetS prevalence as assessed using traditional ATP-III MetS criteria. We further examined effects of use of medications for hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia.

RESULTS: Over the 10 years of follow-up, MetS severity Z-scores increased in 76% of participants from an overall mean of 0.08 ± 0.77 at baseline to 0.48 ± 0.96 at visit 4 with the greatest progression in scores observed among African-American women. Baseline MetS severity scores predicted the time until ATP-III MetS diagnosis, with a model-predicted 77.5% of individuals with a visit 1 MetS severity score of 0.75 progressing to ATP-III MetS within 10 years. The rate of increase in MetS severity score was higher among those younger at baseline but was independent of baseline MetS status or the use of medications to treat blood pressure, lipids and diabetes.

CONCLUSION: The severity of metabolic derangements as measured using this MetS severity score increases over time within individuals and predicts diagnosis of ATP-III MetS. These data may have implications for tracking MetS related risk within individuals over time.

DOI10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2015.09.025
Alternate JournalAtherosclerosis
PubMed ID26409627
PubMed Central IDPMC4734118
Grant ListP20 GM109098 / GM / NIGMS NIH HHS / United States
1R01HL120960 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
268201100011C / / PHS HHS / United States
268201100005C / / PHS HHS / United States
268201100007C / / PHS HHS / United States
268201100012C / / PHS HHS / United States
268201100008C / / PHS HHS / United States
268201100009C / / PHS HHS / United States
U54 GM104942 / GM / NIGMS NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL120960 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U54GM104942 / GM / NIGMS NIH HHS / United States
268201100006C / / PHS HHS / United States
268201100010C / / PHS HHS / United States