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Racial Differences in and Prognostic Value of Biomarkers of Hyperglycemia.

TitleRacial Differences in and Prognostic Value of Biomarkers of Hyperglycemia.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsParrinello CM, Sharrett ARichey, Maruthur NM, Bergenstal RM, Grams ME, Coresh JJ
Secondary AuthorsSelvin E
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume39
Issue4
Pagination589-95
Date Published2016 Apr
ISSN1935-5548
KeywordsBiomarkers, Blood Glucose, Body Mass Index, Cardiovascular Diseases, Continental Population Groups, Deoxyglucose, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Fructosamine, Glycated Hemoglobin A, Humans, Hyperglycemia, Incidence, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Male, Middle Aged, Prognosis, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Serum Albumin
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We compared levels and associations of traditional (fasting glucose, HbA1c) and nontraditional (fructosamine, glycated albumin, and 1,5-anhydroglucitol [1,5-AG]) biomarkers of hyperglycemia with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD), incident end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and prevalent retinopathy in black and white adults.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We included 10,373 participants without (8,096 white, 2,277 black) and 727 with diagnosed diabetes (425 white, 302 black) from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. We used Cox proportional hazards models to compare hazards ratios of CVD and ESRD among blacks and whites from baseline (1990-1992) through 2012. We compared the odds ratios (from logistic regression) of retinopathy among blacks and whites. We tested for the interaction of each biomarker with race.

RESULTS: Median values of biomarkers were higher among blacks versus whites (all P 0.10).

CONCLUSIONS: The prognostic value of HbA1c, fructosamine, glycated albumin, and 1,5-AG with incident CVD, incident ESRD, and prevalent retinopathy were similar by race. Our results support similar interpretation of HbA1c and nontraditional biomarkers of hyperglycemia among black and whites with respect to long-term complications.

DOI10.2337/dc15-1360
Alternate JournalDiabetes Care
PubMed ID26681712
PubMed Central IDPMC4806772
Grant ListHHSN268201100012C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005G / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 DK089174 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007024 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K24 DK106414 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States