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Body size measures, hemostatic and inflammatory markers and risk of venous thrombosis: The Longitudinal Investigation of Thromboembolism Etiology.

TitleBody size measures, hemostatic and inflammatory markers and risk of venous thrombosis: The Longitudinal Investigation of Thromboembolism Etiology.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsCushman M, O'Meara ES, Heckbert SR, Zakai NA, Rosamond WD
Secondary AuthorsFolsom AR
JournalThromb Res
Volume144
Pagination127-32
Date Published2016 Aug
ISSN1879-2472
KeywordsAged, Biomarkers, Body Size, C-Reactive Protein, Cohort Studies, Factor VII, Female, Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products, Follow-Up Studies, Hemostasis, Humans, Inflammation, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Risk Factors, Venous Thrombosis, von Willebrand Factor, Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Obesity is an important venous thrombosis (VT) risk factor but the reasons for this are unclear.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a cohort of 20,914 individuals aged 45 and older without prior VT, we calculated the relative risk (RR) of VT over 12.6years follow-up according to baseline body size measures, and studied whether associations were mediated by biomarkers of hemostasis and inflammation that are related to adiposity.

RESULTS: Greater levels of all body size measures (weight, height, waist, hip circumference, calf circumference, body-mass index, waist-hip ratio, fat mass and fat-free mass) were associated with increased risk of VT, with 4th versus 1st quartile RRs of 1.5-3.0. There were no multiplicative interactions of biomarkers with obesity status. Adjustment for biomarkers associated with VT risk and body size (factors VII and VIII, von Willebrand factor, partial thromboplastin time, D-dimer, C-reactive protein and factor XI) only marginally lowered, or did not impact, the RRs associated with body size measures.

CONCLUSIONS: Greater body size, by multiple measures, is a risk factor for VT. Associations were not mediated by circulating levels of studied biomarkers suggesting that body size relates to VT because of physical factors associated with blood flow, not the hypercoagulability or inflammation associated with adiposity.

DOI10.1016/j.thromres.2016.06.012
Alternate JournalThromb Res
PubMed ID27328432
PubMed Central IDPMC4980192
Grant ListN01 HC055019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC085086 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL059367 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States