Pulse lineResearch With Heart Logo

Sleep Apnea, Sleep Duration and Brain MRI Markers of Cerebral Vascular Disease and Alzheimer's Disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC).

TitleSleep Apnea, Sleep Duration and Brain MRI Markers of Cerebral Vascular Disease and Alzheimer's Disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC).
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsLutsey PL, Norby FL, Gottesman RF, Mosley T, Maclehose RF, Punjabi NM, Shahar E, Jack CR
Secondary AuthorsAlonso A
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue7
Paginatione0158758
Date Published2016
ISSN1932-6203
KeywordsAged, Aged, 80 and over, Alzheimer Disease, Atherosclerosis, Brain, Cerebrovascular Disorders, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Neuroimaging, Organ Size, Polysomnography, Sleep, Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Abstract

BACKGROUND: A growing body of literature has suggested that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and habitual short sleep duration are linked to poor cognitive function. Neuroimaging studies may provide insight into this relation.

OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypotheses that OSA and habitual short sleep duration, measured at ages 54-73 years, would be associated with adverse brain morphology at ages 67-89 years.

METHODS: Included in this analysis are 312 ARIC study participants who underwent in-home overnight polysomnography in 1996-1998 and brain MRI scans about 15 years later (2012-2013). Sleep apnea was quantified by the apnea-hypopnea index and categorized as moderate/severe (≥15.0 events/hour), mild (5.0-14.9 events/hour), or normal (

RESULTS: At the time of the sleep study participants were 61.7 (SD: 5.0) years old and 54% female; 19% had moderate/severe sleep apnea. MRI imaging took place 14.8 (SD: 1.0) years later, when participants were 76.5 (SD: 5.2) years old. In multivariable models which accounted for body mass index, neither OSA nor abnormal sleep duration were statistically significantly associated with odds of cerebral infarcts, WMH brain volumes or regional brain volumes.

CONCLUSIONS: In this community-based sample, mid-life OSA and habitually short sleep duration were not associated with later-life cerebral markers of vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. However, selection bias may have influenced our results and the modest sample size led to relatively imprecise associations.

DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0158758
Alternate JournalPLoS One
PubMed ID27415826
PubMed Central IDPMC4944966
Grant ListU01 HL096812 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 HL096917 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 HL096902 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 HL096814 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 HL096899 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States