Pulse lineResearch With Heart Logo

Body-mass index and all-cause mortality: individual-participant-data meta-analysis of 239 prospective studies in four continents.

TitleBody-mass index and all-cause mortality: individual-participant-data meta-analysis of 239 prospective studies in four continents.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsDi Angelantonio E, Bhupathiraju S, Wormser D, Gao P, Kaptoge S, de Gonzalez ABerrington, Cairns B, Huxley R, Jackson C, Joshy G, Lewington S, Manson JA, Murphy N, Patel A, Samet J, Woodward M, Zheng W, Zhou M, Bansal N, Barricarte A, Carter B, Cerhan J, Smith G, Fang X, Franco O, Green J, Halsey J, Hildebrand J, Jung K, Korda R, McLerran D, Moore S, O'Keeffe L, Paige E, Ramond A, Reeves G, Rolland B, Sacerdote C, Sattar N, Sofianopoulou E, Stevens J, Thun M, Ueshima H, Yang L, Yun Y, Willeit P, Banks E, Beral V, Chen Z, Gapstur S, Gunter M, Hartge P, Jee S, Lam T-H, Peto R, Potter J, Willett W, Thompson S, Danesh J
Secondary AuthorsHu F
JournalLancet
Volume388
Issue10046
Pagination776-86
Date Published2016 08 20
ISSN1474-547X
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Asia, Australia, Body Mass Index, Cause of Death, Europe, Female, Humans, Linear Models, Male, Middle Aged, Mortality, New Zealand, North America, Overweight, Prospective Studies
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Overweight and obesity are increasing worldwide. To help assess their relevance to mortality in different populations we conducted individual-participant data meta-analyses of prospective studies of body-mass index (BMI), limiting confounding and reverse causality by restricting analyses to never-smokers and excluding pre-existing disease and the first 5 years of follow-up.

METHODS: Of 10 625 411 participants in Asia, Australia and New Zealand, Europe, and North America from 239 prospective studies (median follow-up 13·7 years, IQR 11·4-14·7), 3 951 455 people in 189 studies were never-smokers without chronic diseases at recruitment who survived 5 years, of whom 385 879 died. The primary analyses are of these deaths, and study, age, and sex adjusted hazard ratios (HRs), relative to BMI 22·5-

FINDINGS: All-cause mortality was minimal at 20·0-25·0 kg/m(2) (HR 1·00, 95% CI 0·98-1·02 for BMI 20·0-

INTERPRETATION: The associations of both overweight and obesity with higher all-cause mortality were broadly consistent in four continents. This finding supports strategies to combat the entire spectrum of excess adiposity in many populations.

FUNDING: UK Medical Research Council, British Heart Foundation, National Institute for Health Research, US National Institutes of Health.

DOI10.1016/S0140-6736(16)30175-1
Alternate JournalLancet
PubMed ID27423262
PubMed Central IDPMC4995441
Grant ListMR/K02700X/1 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
R01 DK058845 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
P01 CA087969 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
UM1 CA176726 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
DK58845 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK046200 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
U54 CA155626 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
P01 CA87969 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
MC_UU_12013/1 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
G9900923 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
UM1 CA167552 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
G0700474 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
UM1 CA182910 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States