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Adequate vitamin D status is associated with the reduced odds of prevalent diabetic retinopathy in African Americans and Caucasians.

TitleAdequate vitamin D status is associated with the reduced odds of prevalent diabetic retinopathy in African Americans and Caucasians.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsMillen AE, Sahli MW, Nie J, Lamonte MJ, Lutsey PL, Klein BEK, Mares JA, Meyers KJ, Andrews CA
Secondary AuthorsKlein R
JournalCardiovasc Diabetol
Volume15
Issue1
Pagination128
Date Published2016 09 01
ISSN1475-2840
KeywordsAfrican Americans, Aged, Biomarkers, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diabetic Retinopathy, Dietary Supplements, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Odds Ratio, Prevalence, Prospective Studies, Protective Factors, Risk Factors, Time Factors, United States, Vitamin D, Vitamin D Deficiency
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Vitamin D status has been hypothesized to protect against development of diabetic retinopathy via its anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic properties. Additionally, in vitro and in vivo studies suggest vitamin D favorably influences blood pressure and blood glucose control, strong risk factors for diabetic retinopathy. We examined the association between vitamin D status and prevalent diabetic retinopathy in participants with diabetes from a population-based cohort.

METHODS: Among participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study with diabetes at visit 3 (1993-1995), 1339 (906 Caucasians, 433 African Americans) had serum 25-hydroxyvitamin (25[OH]D) concentrations assessed at visit 2 (1989-1992) and nonmydriatic retinal photographs taken at visit 3. Dietary intake of vitamin D was assessed at visit 1 (1987-1989). Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for diabetic retinopathy by categories of season-adjusted 25(OH)D (

RESULTS: ORs (95 % CIs) for retinopathy, adjusted for race and duration, were 0.77 (0.45-1.32), 0.64 (0.37-1.10), and 0.39 (0.20-0.75), p for trend = 0.001, for participants with 25(OH)D of 30-

CONCLUSIONS: 25(OH)D concentrations ≥75 nmol/L were associated with lower odds of any retinopathy assessed 3 years later. We speculate this may be due in part to vitamin D's influence on blood glucose control.

DOI10.1186/s12933-016-0434-1
Alternate JournalCardiovasc Diabetol
PubMed ID27586865
PubMed Central IDPMC5009647
Grant ListHHSN268201100012C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL103706 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005G / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG041776 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States