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Prognostic Importance of Dyspnea for Cardiovascular Outcomes and Mortality in Persons without Prevalent Cardiopulmonary Disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

TitlePrognostic Importance of Dyspnea for Cardiovascular Outcomes and Mortality in Persons without Prevalent Cardiopulmonary Disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsSantos M, Kitzman DW, Matsushita K, Loehr LR, Sueta CA
Secondary AuthorsShah AM
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue10
Paginatione0165111
Date Published2016
ISSN1932-6203
KeywordsDyspnea, Female, Heart Failure, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Myocardial Infarction, Prognosis, Pulmonary Heart Disease
Abstract

BACKGROUND: The relationship between dyspnea and incident heart failure (HF) and myocardial infarction (MI) among patients without previously diagnosed cardiopulmonary disease is unclear. We studied the prognostic relevance of self-reported dyspnea for cardiovascular outcomes and all-cause mortality in persons without previously diagnosed cardiopulmonary disease.

METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied 10 881 community-dwelling participants (mean age 57±6, 56% women, 25% black) who were free of prevalent cardiopulmonary disease from Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Dyspnea status at study entry using the modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) scale. The primary outcomes were time to HF, MI or all-cause death. Dyspnea prevalence was 22%, and was mild (mMRC grade 1 or 2) in 21% and moderate-to-severe (mMRC 3 or 4) in 1%. The main correlates of dyspnea were older age, female sex, higher BMI and active smoking. Over a follow-up of 19±5 years, greater self-reported dyspnea severity was associated with worse prognosis. Mild dyspnea was associated with significantly heightened risk of HF (adjusted Hazard Ratio, HR,1.30; 95% CI: 1.16-1.46), MI (adjusted HR 1.34; 95%CI: 1.20-1.50), and death (adjusted HR 1.16; 95%CI: 1.06-1.26), with moderate/severe dyspnea associated with an even greater risk (adjusted HR 2.14, 95%CI: 1.59-2.89; 1.93, 95%CI: 1.41-2.56; 1.96, 95%CI: 1.55-2.48, respectively).

CONCLUSION: In community-dwelling persons free of previously diagnosed cardiopulmonary disease, self-reported dyspnea is common and, even when of mild intensity, it is independently associated with a greater risk of incident HF, MI, and death. Our data emphasize the prognostic importance of even mild self-reported dyspnea for cardiovascular outcomes.

DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0165111
Alternate JournalPLoS One
PubMed ID27780208
PubMed Central IDPMC5079579