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Ferritin levels and risk of heart failure-the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

TitleFerritin levels and risk of heart failure-the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsSilvestre OM, Gonçalves A, Nadruz W, Claggett B, Couper DJ, Eckfeldt JH, Pankow JS, Anker SD
Secondary AuthorsSolomon SD
JournalEur J Heart Fail
Volume19
Issue3
Pagination340-347
Date Published2017 03
ISSN1879-0844
KeywordsBiomarkers, Cohort Studies, Female, Ferritins, Heart Failure, Humans, Incidence, Iron, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, United States
Abstract

AIMS: Severe iron overload is associated with cardiac damage, while iron deficiency has been related to worse outcomes in subjects with heart failure (HF). This study investigated the relationship between ferritin, a marker of iron status, and the incidence of HF in a community-based cohort.

METHODS AND RESULTS: We examined 1063 participants who were free of heart failure from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study in whom ferritin serum levels were measured at baseline (1987-1989). The participants (mean age 52.7 ± 5.5 years, 62% women), were categorized in low (200 ng/mL in women and >300 ng/mL in men; n = 247) ferritin levels. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the relationship between ferritin and incident HF. After 21 ± 4.6 years of follow-up, HF occurred in 144 (13.5%) participants. When compared with participants with normal ferritin levels, participants with low ferritin levels had a higher risk of HF [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15-4.35; P = 0.02] as did those with high ferritin levels (HR = 1.81, 95% CI 1.01-3.25; P = 0.04), after adjusting for potential confounders. Notably, low ferritin levels remained associated with incident HF even after excluding subjects with anaemia (HR = 2.28, 95% CI 1.11-4.68; P = 0.03).

CONCLUSION: Derangements in iron metabolism, either low or high ferritin serum levels, were associated with higher risk of incident HF in a general population, even without concurrent anaemia. These findings suggest that iron imbalance might play a role in the development of HF.

DOI10.1002/ejhf.701
Alternate JournalEur J Heart Fail
PubMed ID27976478
PubMed Central IDPMC5334451
Grant ListHHSN268201100012C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005G / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 DK056918 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States